What is New in Glaucoma?

first_imgFacebook4Tweet0Pin0 Submitted by Dr. Stephen Reck, M.D. Clarus Eye CenterThe Clarus Eye Centre team includes nationally recognized and fellowship-trained ophthalmologists (from left) Drs. Stephen Reck, Penny Reck, Jay Rudd, and Gary Scholes.January is Glaucoma Awareness Month, so I wanted to provide a little information on some new developments in glaucoma diagnosis and management at Clarus Eye Centre.  Before I do, I should explain what glaucoma is and provide a few helpful links for additional information.Glaucoma is what we call the group of conditions that cause progressive loss of nerve tissue at the end of the optic nerve, where it enters the back of the eye.  Eventually, this nerve damage can result in loss of vision, usually starting in the periphery and advancing toward the center over time.  Glaucoma is the leading cause of permanent blindness globally, and it is the second-leading cause of blindness in the United States, behind macular degeneration.  Fortunately, most people who have glaucoma never go blind.  The key to preventing vision loss from glaucoma is early detection and treatment.Glaucoma is usually painless and the vision loss usually goes unnoticed until the disease is very advanced.  The best way to detect glaucoma and preserve vision is to have eye examinations at the appropriate intervals. Young, healthy people should have exams every few years.  People over 60, who need glasses or contacts, have hypertension, or diabetes, or have had eye surgery should be seen at least once a year.   People who have certain medical conditions may require more frequent exams, so it is important to follow-up as advised by your physician.People often worry about getting glaucoma and want to be tested for it.  First, measuring the pressure in the eye does not tell if a person has glaucoma.  The eye pressure reading tells nothing about the health of the optic nerve.  The best initial test for glaucoma is a complete eye examination with an ophthalmologist or optometrist.  In most cases, this is all that is needed.  However, if there are noted risk factors for glaucoma, additional testing may be recommended.  This testing usually includes measurement of the peripheral vision and laser scanning of the optic nerves.  Testing is non-invasive and completely painless.  With these results, we can determine the level of severity and rate of progression of the glaucoma.Treatment is recommended for people whose glaucoma presents a significant risk of vision loss. Many mild cases of glaucoma do not require treatment.  For those who do, prescription eyedrops are usually tried first.  Your doctor will work with you to find a therapy that is effective and tolerable.  Sometimes, laser treatment is recommended, such as trabeculoplasty, or iridotomy   In other cases, surgical intervention is indicated.  The surgeons at Clarus Eye Centre are seeing excellent results with a minimally-invasive surgical procedure, called iStent, which is performed in combination with cataract surgery.  We also perform trabeculectomy and glaucoma drainage tube implants which are still the most commonly used, and most effective surgical procedures for controlling glaucoma.Early detection and effective treatment are the key to preventing vision loss from glaucoma.  If you have not been in to see us recently, please call to schedule an appointment with any one of our doctors.last_img read more

Can I Afford to Have LASIK? Aurora LASIK says Yes

first_imgFacebook9Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Dr. Jay Rudd, Aurora LASIKOne of the most frequent questions we get about LASIK is, “How much does it cost?”  Rightfully, most of us are cost conscious. However, those considering blade-free LASIK should weigh the cost alongside the tremendous lifelong benefit of clearer vision.So, let me first address the issue of LASIK pricing.If you’re considering LASIK, you’ve probably noticed widely varying prices advertised by LASIK providers. Some are hard to resist. However, people quickly learn in the disclaimers of bargain basement pricing that there’s a catch. Either it’s the additional cost of “enhancements” that aren’t included (but are essential for the best outcomes). Or, the provider is not using the latest technology that will deliver the kind of results you want for the only two eyes you’ve got!Dr. Jay Rudd helps patients see better each day at Lacey’s Aurora LASIK.As a fellowship-trained surgeon for over 16 years, my highest priority has always been to provide the most advanced options available for clearer, brighter vision. So when we opened Aurora LASIK late last year, we were determined to offer transparent pricing that ensures you’ll get the highest level of care available in the U.S., with no pricing surprises.  After all, who wants to cut corners when your vision is on the line?We also want to ensure that, not only will our patients be thrilled with the results (96% of our LASIK patients are seeing 20/20 or better), they can count on their investment lasting a lifetime. So we offer our lifetime enhancement policy that delivers peace of mind into the future.Now, let’s talk about that investment. It’s always interesting to me how people will spend $5/day on a latte (that’s $1,820 a year) or $100/month or more for digital cable (or $1,200/year), yet when it comes to LASIK, they’ll trust their eyes (and future eyesight) to the lowest bidder.Aurora LASIK’s Lacey offices provide the most advanced technologies available. Photo courtesy: Aurora LASIKEven those who turn to contacts or eyeglasses often fail to consider the compounded cost that can run, conservatively, $500 a year (or $5,000 over a ten-year period).The national average for blade-free LASIK is about $2,250/eye. At Aurora LASIK, our $2,200/eye pricing includes all pre- and post-operative care, in addition to our lifetime enhancement policy — to bring you the best vision outcome possible.And for a limited time only, we’re offering our summer special of $500 off LASIK.To make it even more affordable, we have special 100% financing through Alphaeon Credit, allowing you to create a payment plan that fits your budget.Isn’t it time you invested in something that will open up a new world of better vision — for a lifetime? Call us today at (360) 459-LASIK to schedule a free screening. Or join us for one of our free seminars, and you’ll be entered to win $1,000 off LASIK!last_img read more

Annual Thurston County Homeless Census January 25

first_imgFacebook30Tweet0Pin0Submitted by City of OlympiaThe Annual Thurston County Homeless Census will be conducted on Thursday, January 25, 2018. This effort is part of a nationwide “Point in Time” (PIT) Count of Homeless People” that determines who is homeless and why. Census workers will fan out across the County to conduct a street census, survey people at food banks, community meals, and other places that offer survival commodities and operate four Homeless Connect Events. All shelter and transitional housing providers will count the people staying with them on the night of the Count.If you can help, please contact Faith Addicott, Homeless Event Manager at 360-709-2679 or faddicot@ci.olympia.wa.us.Homeless Connect Event LocationsSingle adults: Providence Community Care Center, OlympiaYouth: Rosie’s Place – Community Youth Services, OlympiaFamilies: Family Support Center, OlympiaRural: ROOF Community Services, RochesterFor more information, please visit olympiawa.gov/housingAbout the Thurston County Homeless CensusThe Annual Homeless Census is managed by Thurston County, with the City of Olympia coordinating all Census activity.Census results are compiled into the County’s annual “Point in Time Count of Homeless Persons Report” and reported to the state and federal governments to ensure a proportionate level of public funding for local shelters, transitional housing, and related supportive services. According to Thurston County Commissioner Bud Blake,“Over the past decade, we have invested millions of dollars in community-based programs and projects that have helped hundreds of homeless families and individuals get back into housing and resume their lives,” said Commissioner Bud Blake.“Unfortunately, the results of our annual Homeless Census reveal that each year new people fall into homelessness due to job loss, rent increases, unmet health needs and other challenges. We need the best possible data to ensure that our limited funding goes to resources, proven programs and best practices.”Commissioner Blake notes that the results of the 2018 Census will be used to chart the County’s progress in its soon to be released five-year plan to reduce homelessness by half.Locally, census results are shared with all community stakeholders – policy makers, funders, service providers, concerned citizens and the homeless themselves. The final report will also include an assessment of available resources to help people get back to independence.New for 2018This year, the City will go beyond the state-mandated Count of Homeless People to include a pre-dawn door way count and a camp census. These efforts, funded directly by the City of Olympia will focus on getting a more accurate head count in addition to collecting the more detailed personal information called for in the PIT Census. While the full census will still be conducted, the City’s count is intended to reveal the true number of unsheltered people and to release the results as soon as possible.“It’s critical for our County to know who the homeless are before we can address ways to help them get back on their feet and invest our resources wisely,” said Olympia Council Member Jessica Bateman, who noted that most of the existing resources are located in Olympia. “When our homeless safety net fails, it hurts our homeless neighbors, and it also impacts our downtown and neighborhoods.”Previous Year’s DataThe original goal of the Homeless Census was to use the data to guide efforts to reduce homelessness by half. Started in 2006, the first census found 441 homeless people, which defined the goal to reduce homelessness by half to a total of 221 homeless people. In January of 2017, the Homeless Census found a total of 534 homeless people, representing a 21% increase, or 93 more people than identified in the 2006 census of 441 people. However, the 2017 Homeless Census results did indicate a significant 45% drop in homelessness from the 2010 all-time high of 976.last_img read more

Come Grow with the WSU Master Gardeners of Thurston County

first_imgFacebook9Tweet0Pin0Submitted by WSU Thurston County ExtensionNext to digging in the dirt, there’s nothing gardeners enjoy more than learning about their favorite plants. An easy way to increase your gardening knowledge is to join the next Washington State University Extension Master Gardener volunteer training course. Master Gardener’s is a volunteer service gardening organization, cultivating plants, people, and communities since 1973.The WSU Master Gardener training course consists of 20 weeks of indoor and outdoor classroom, online, and hands-on activities. The 2019 training will run from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. on alternating Fridays from January 25, 2019 through June 7, 2019.Instructors provide an overview of related subjects and environmentally sound practices including: vegetables, ornamentals, soils, pruning, water-wise gardening, weeds, composting, plant disease diagnosis, insects etc.A WSU Master Gardener volunteer gains more than improved gardening skills. The Thurston County WSU Master Gardener volunteer training also focuses on skill building to support volunteers in better serving our community. The fast-paced coursework involves expanding communication skills, team dynamics, problem-solving, project leadership, risk management, technology, and more.“What really sets Master Gardeners apart from other home gardeners is their commitment to lifelong learning and sharing of accurate gardening information with others. Trainees join more than 200 volunteers who have diverse expertise and interests. As a result volunteers have fun learning from one another while making friendships and a difference in our community,” said Cori Carlton, Program Manager.Upon completion of classroom work, graduates must volunteer 60 hours on community-based garden service projects before earning the WSU Master Gardener title.Tuition is $300 which covers all course training supplies and field trips. Payment plans are available and a limited number of full or partial scholarships are available to those in need.To be considered for a training spot you must complete an application and attend a 1.5 hour pre-orientation session. To see if the program is for you, please join us for a pre-orientation session.Pre-orientations are scheduled at three locations: WSU Thurston County Extension office, Lacey Library, and Tumwater Library. No pre-registration needed.Pre-orientations held at the WSU Thurston County Extension Office at 3054 Carpenter Rd. SE, Olympia, WA  98503. November 6, 2018 from 5:00 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.November 13, 2018 from 10:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.November 27, 2018 from 5:00 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.December 8, 2018 from 10:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.December 12, 2018 from 5:00 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.Pre-orientation held at the Tumwater Library Community Room at 7023 New Market Street SE, Tumwater, WA  98501.December 3, 2018 from 5:00 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.Pre-orientation held at the Lacey Library Community Room at 500 College Street SE, Lacey, WA  98503.December 11, 2018 from 12:30 p.m. to 2:00 p.m.Course spots are filled on a first come first, served basis. Space is limited so apply today! The last day to apply is December 14, 2018, only if seats are still available. Applications can be downloaded from our website. https://extension.wsu.edu/thurston/gardening/Non-Volunteer Track: We do have an option for those who are interested in taking the course for professional or personal enrichment but with no desire of volunteering. The cost is $600 and space is limited. Please contact the Program Manager at carltoc@co.thurston.wa.us or 360-867-2162 for further details.last_img read more

Introducing the Intercity Transit Class Pass

first_imgFacebook95Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Intercity TransitThe Intercity Transit Class Pass is a free bus pass available to public and nonprofit schools and youth organizations to take field trips using regularly scheduled Intercity Transit buses.Qualifying groups can request the free pass by submitting an online form at least three weeks prior to their trip. Along with the pass, groups can request a classroom presentation from an Intercity Transit educator to prepare students for their bus ride.The Class Pass makes public transit accessible to more youth, a goal of Intercity Transit’s Walk N Roll youth education program. Learn more about the Class Pass and submit a request form at intercitytransit.com/walknroll/class-pass.last_img read more

WDFW Approves a Six-Day Razor Clam Dig Starting Tuesday

first_imgFacebook30Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Washington Department of Fish and WildlifeRazor clam diggers can return to ocean beaches for six days of digging beginning January 21. State shellfish managers with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) approved a dig on evening low tides after marine toxin tests showed the clams are safe to eat.The approved dig is for the following beaches, dates and low tides:January 21, Tuesday, 4:23 pm -0.1 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, MocrocksJanuary 22, Wednesday, 5:10 pm -0.5 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, CopalisJanuary 23, Thursday, 5:53 pm -0.6 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, MocrocksJanuary 24, Friday, 6:32 pm -0.6 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, CopalisJanuary 25, Saturday, 7:08 pm -0.5 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, MocrocksJanuary 26, Sunday, 7:42 pm -0.3 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, CopalisNo digging is allowed before noon for allowed digs, when low tide occurs in the evening.“Weather and surf during our last opener dissuaded many from participating,” said Dan Ayres, WDFW coastal shellfish manager. “The good news is that this means there are still a great many clams out there for this and future digs.”For a list of proposed razor clam digs on Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis and Mocrocks beaches through February, please see our razor clam webpage.Ayres said additional tentative razor clam digs for March and later will be announced in early February.WDFW authorizes each dig independently after getting the results of marine toxin testing. Final approval of the tentatively scheduled openings will depend on whether results of marine toxin tests show the clams are safe to eat.In order to ensure conservation of clams for future generations, WDFW sets tentative razor clam seasons that are based on the results from an annual coast-wide razor clam stock assessment and by considering harvest to date. To see videos of WDFW’s sustainable management work for razor clam seasons, visit our razor clam page.WDFW is also asking razor clam fans around the state to weigh in on the perennial question: Which is better, clam gun or shovel? To register support for a favored digging method, clam diggers can post a photo or video, complete with hashtag #TeamClamShovel or #TeamClamGun on any social media before the end of the spring season.Additional safety considerations are important this time of year. “Diggers want to be sure to come prepared with good lighting devices and always keep an eye on the surf, particularly at this time of year when low tides come at dusk and after dark,” said Ayres. “Diggers can also start gathering clams an hour or two before the tide, which on some days allows folks to enjoy daylight for most of their time on the beach.”All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2019-20 fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available on WDFW’s website and from license vendors around the state.Under state law, diggers at open beaches can take 15 razor clams per day and are required to keep the first 15 they dig. Each digger’s clams must be kept in a separate container.WDFW is the state agency tasked with preserving, protecting and perpetuating fish, wildlife and ecosystems, while providing sustainable fishing, hunting and other outdoor recreation opportunities.Persons with disabilities who need to receive this information in an alternative format or who need reasonable accommodations to participate in WDFW-sponsored public meetings or other activities may contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or email (dolores.noyes@dfw.wa.gov). For more information, see https://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/requests-accommodationlast_img read more

Which Indian cricketer has the most lit social media?

first_imgImage Courtesy: Instagram(@shikhardofficial)Advertisement gv8e7NBA Finals | Brooklyn Vsix2bWingsuit rodeo📽Sindre E9fk7( IG: @_aubreyfisher @imraino ) 1diwgWould you ever consider trying this?😱8v4l92Can your students do this? 🌚uy8Roller skating! Powered by Firework When not smashing huge sixes, bowling out vital opposition or performing acrobatic fielding on the pitch, the stars of the Indian cricket team know the way to keep their fans entertained with the use of social media. Over the years, the number of social media users in the country have grown abruptly, and with so the audience the cricketers of the country have to amuse when staying off the pitch, along with the captain Virat Kohli recently becoming the first Indian user to hit 50 million followers on Instagram. From trolling fellow team members, recording workout session to uploading creative re-enactment of dances or movie scenes, the players come up with some of the most hilarious and amazing ideas. One questions you may think- which Team India icon has the most ‘lit’ content on social media? Well the answer is- Yuzvendra Chahal.Advertisement Image Courtesy: Instagram(@shikhardofficial)Yes, Yuzvendra Chahal. India’s superstar limited overs bowler is very active all across his social media accounts, and posts some of the most fascinating and hysterical content for his huge follower count. The player has 1.3 million followers on Twitter, 2.6 million on Instagram and over 96 thousand followers on FaceBook, where he is comparatively less active.Often making headlines for his out of the box posts on Twitter or Instagram, the spinner creates very exciting themes for his posts, which becomes viral among his fan base all the time.Advertisement Chahal has an account on the video sharing app Tik Tok, where he often makes videos along with his fellow team members and shares them on Twitter.Recently, Chahal recreated a famous scene from the Bollywood comedy movie ‘Dhol’, along with superstar opener Rohit Sharma and young bowler Khaleel Ahmed.Advertisement “Off field performance on point” – was another post Chahal tweeted that took the social media by storm. The cricketer was seen dancing with squad mates Shreyas Iyer, Shivam Dube, and the fourth person whp hid his face, but fans went on arguing him to be either Rohit Sharma or Rishabh Pant.Chahal is also famous for being a fitness freak, often posting his shirtless photos on his Instagram account, flaunting his six pack abs. Recently, a group photo of the shirtless Indian team, including Shikhar Dhawan, Navdeep Saini, Manish Pandey and Shreyas Iyer along with Chahal, grabbed the netizens’ attention.Chahal is often seen doing funny stuff in the gym. Recently the player uploaded a video where he was hilariously mimicking iconic MMA fighter Connor McGregor.However, Chahal also regularly shares of his devotion to fitness and workout.His social media is also full with selfies with his teammates, and Chahal even coined the term ‘Kul-Cha’ whenever he posts a picture together with Kuldeep YadavChahal is also an avid lover of animals. He often advocates for animal rights and wildlife conservation, as his supporters are always amazed at his humane nature towards the wordless.The cricketer has several dogs as pets, and he isn’t shy on how much he loves and cares for them.The Royal Challengers Bangalore star also recently got a puppy named ‘Scotty’ which he shared on Twitter.Before cricket, Chahal was a professional Chess player, and represented India at the World Youth Chess Championship. Although giving up on chess due to lack of sponsors, he still continues to enjoy a board of chess anywhere, even in a flight.The under-12 National Chess Champion also advocates to learn the game, and also released a motivation video on Instagram on how Chess is still helping him even in his cricketing career.Since his international debut in 2016, Chahal has earned 40 ODI and 37 T20 caps for the Men in Blue. The leg break bowler picked up three wickets in the T20 series and six wickets in the ODI series against New Zealand last month.Check out Yuzvendra Chahal on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook.Also read-Chahal points out Dhoni’s seat in team bus and reveals that it still remains unoccupied Advertisementlast_img read more

Diet and Exercise Are Perfect Together For Weight Loss

first_imgBy Mark William LiskyAccording to many philosophies and religions, spring represents renewal and rebirth. It’s the time nature comes out of its long winter sleep with a flurry of activity. The most important activity for both plants and animals is to seek energy, be it from sunlight or food. Plants and animals have been dormant for the last few months, living off the energy supplies stored in either their body fat or in their roots.Like nature, people also come out of their winter sleeps during springtime. Unlike nature, the majority of people haven’t been living off their stored energy supplies. In fact they’ve been adding to them. And now that summer is closing in fast, some of those folks who have put on extra pounds of stored energy (in the form of body-fat) are frantically looking for a way to lighten the load.Others have been storing their energy supplies for decades of winters and now find themselves medically obese.Whether you have gained a few pounds over the winter, or you have become obese, all is not lost. It’s said that “hope springs eternal” and that hope begins with dieting and exercise.Both of these activities are recommended by every professional health organization in the country, although their immense value is still not realized by the most of the public. However, before anyone begins a personal spring renewal program, they need to learn the facts in order to choose the right path.Good Fat, Bad FatAny diet for reducing stores of energy needs to focus on losing non-essential body fat called adipose tissue, not overall bodyweight. Our total body weight consists of bones, muscle, fat, water, etc. We need it all to be healthy. Even when it comes to adipose tissue, we need to have a certain amount because some fat is “essential.” Essential body fat is kept in bone marrow, organs and the fat abundant tissue in the central nervous system. Essential body fat is also needed for other functions including insulating the skin, protecting cells and organs from trauma and providing a reserve supply of energy in case of an emergency.Initial Weight Loss vs. Real Weight LossUnderstanding that the body is made up of different cells that have mass is why some of the initial weight loss on most diets is water (up to five to seven pounds), not adipose tissue. Initial water loss happens because when a person starts a diet, especially ones that are severely calorie restrictive like the South Beach Diet, the brain throws a fit. The principle fuel source for the brain is the simple sugar glucose. The body converts the sugars and starches you eat into a stored form of glucose and initially hides it in your muscles and liver for safekeeping.When you go on a diet that drastically cuts calories without an adaptation period, the brain’s fuel supply is compromised. Cells in the brain are unique in that they burn up nearly all of the fuel almost the moment it arrives. This requires an uninterrupted flow of glucose. It’s like the brain cells are always living on the edge. In order to keep the fuel coming from the pump, the brain seeks it out in the supply stored in the muscles.When the body stores converted sugars in the muscles, they’re attached to a water molecule. When the stored sugars are released to keep the brain from freaking out (this is why people get cranky when they start a diet), water is also released. The end result is loss of water weight, not adipose tissue. All the water weight will return the second the diet ends.All Diets Do WorkIt is a fact that all diet programs work, at least for a short while. It has been shown in research that within one year of starting a new diet, 99 percent of the people using the diet gain any weight that was lost back. Dramatic short-lived results is one reason or “secret” that authors of fad diet books tend to use titles such as, “Lose Thirty Pounds In Thirty Days”They know from research that anyone can lose thirty pounds in thirty days if they diet. They also know that the thirty pounds lost will come right back. That’s why many diet books usually do not mention what do six months from the start of the diet. Also if the fad diet is unpleasantly frugal or Spartan, the likelihood of using it year-round is not great. If a person is going to choose a diet program, it needs to be one that not only helps lose non-essential adipose tissue, but one that keeps it off year after year.Diets RevisitedWith so many views on dieting, it may prove wise to revisit some schools of thought. First is the “Mediterranean” diet. This diet is based on research from the 60s, focusing on the eating patterns of countries in the Mediterranean. This diet includes high intakes of fresh vegetables, nuts, olive oils, olives, fish, lamb, cheese and lots of wine with some complex breads. Studies show that this diet is very effective for weight loss. Also, this diet has been proven in research to improve the condition of patients with heart disease.Another is the “Paleolithic” diet first proposed by Dr. S. Boyd Eaton M.D.  In 1988 and is based on what humans ate before the development of agriculture. Data for the diet was provided by research on modern-day hunter-gatherers. The ratio between animal calories to plant calories in hunter-gatherer cultures is about 65 percent to 35 percent respectively. The Paleolithic diet emphasizes meats from grass-fed animals or wild game, free-range poultry, seasonal fruits, raw nuts, raw seeds and lots of fresh leafy vegetables with no dairy, breads or potatoes.Since its first release, several other diets have followed the “Paleo” line of reasoning. These types of diets, like the Mediterranean diet, are really based on changing long term eating patterns and lifestyles. To succeed in either of these styles, it’s recommended to slowly replace the common foods a person may eat like breads and pastas with more vegetables and salads.The next school of thought is the “High Protein/Fat Low Carbohydrate” diets. These are a group of diets that began appearing in the 1990s including, Dr. Atkins New Diet Revolution, the Sugar Busters and Protein Power to name a few. All of these diets are based on a high intake of protein and fat and a low intake of sugars and carbohydrates.The reasoning behind these approaches is that eating large amount of carbohydrates, provoke a hunger response, which encourages overeating. Also, overeating carbohydrates causes the release of large amounts of the storage hormone insulin, resulting in body fat weight gains.These diets also trigger a process called “ketosis” which may help the body to burn adipose tissue. From observations, these diets have been shown to work. However rapid weight loss also causes the loss of lean muscle mass along with adipose tissue. Research has shown that people following Dr. Atkins diet, for example, lose up to 50 percent of their lean muscle mass. Constant loss of lean muscle mass has been shown in research to promote accelerated cell aging.In order to be successful at choosing your approach to healthy eating, it is true that you are what you eat. When crafting your diet, find one that you enjoy. If you don’t enjoy it you will quit. Think long term. Pay attention to the results you’re experiencing. Learn what works and what doesn’t.The Skinny on ExerciseIf, along with dieting, a person wants to add exercise to their program, daily activities such as shopping or doing the laundry simple won’t do. A person needs to kick it up a bit. More challenging daily aerobic activities or “cardio” activities like pushing a lawnmower or biking to the store will do. All types of physical activity help as long as they are performed at a moderate or vigorous intensity for at least 10 minutes at a time.Walking is another great activity. Begin your program with brisk 15-minute walks, four to five times a week. When you feel ready, add 10 minutes to the walks. Eventually, try working up to 45-60 minute walks. This increase should happen over weeks, not days. When performing any aerobic activity, increases in intensity need to gradual in order for the body to adapt, just like dieting.Besides an aerobic activity, strengthening muscles by lifting weight at least two days a week should be mandatory. Not only does strength training improve your overall sense of well being, it helps maintain lean muscle mass while dieting. This is extremely important to maintain health. A strength training program should work all the major muscle groups of your body – legs, hips, back, chest and abdomen. One exercise per body part is all that is necessary. A strength training program to accompany a diet shouldn’t last more than 20 minutes, tops.So, as spring is here with summer coming, it is a perfect time to renew your health by losing weight and getting stronger. So, spring into your new diet and exercise routine with commitment, compliance and consistency.Mark William Lisky is a personal fitness advisor. Mark can be reached at (732) 933-9070 or e-mail: mlisky@liskyfitness.com.last_img read more

Redevelopment Activity Gaining Momentum at Former Fort Monmouth

first_img“These are awesome plans, but we still must sell the real estate and make money off of it to pay the bills and replace and install new infrastructure like water, sewer and lights, which has been ongoing since FMERA took over the fort,” Steadman cautioned. “The fort is a city within three cities. All types of things arise each day. We still get calls and visits from those who served and lived there going back to World War II.” “FMERA is a team of 10 people,” Steadman said. “We can only be successful if we’ve got the support of our stakeholders, including the New Jersey Economic Development Authority, the (federal) Environmental Protection Agency, the state departments of environmental protection and transportation, the three municipalities, and more. They have all been great partners, especially Monmouth County under the leadership of Freeholder Lillian Burry.” Burry has officially represented the county in the fort’s redevelopment since its closure. For Tinton Falls, that 40-acre site is next to the borough’s existing municipal complex on Tinton Avenue where Lennar Corporation has begun construction of 243 homes and 58,000 square feet of commercial space called Patriot’s Square. Lennar is also building 45 single-family detached homes, dubbed Anthem Place, on a nearby 15-acre site near completed projects Trinity Hall School, Commvault and the county recreation center, where streets have already been laid out with curbing. Nuse said model homes should open in 2020 and prospective buyers have already expressed interest. While each fort parcel has designated future uses in the master plan, FMERA stresses it will entertain alternate, “outside-the-box” compliant proposals. “Highest and best use” is a phrase frequently used by fort officials. Near Suneagles Golf Course in Eatontown, the 64-acre Howard Commons former fort housing area will require demolition of 480 deteriorating Army homes. After initial buyer HovWest backed out in 2015, Nuse said he hopes the new approved compliant bidder’s plans will be approved to go to contract in the first quarter of 2020. The developer, who will not be named until the contract is presented per FMERA rules, proposes a mix of high-end retail and 302 housing units with 20 percent affordable. Officials declined to name specific tenants, but said the retail portion should fill 250,000 square feet. In Eatontown, the highest profile town center on Parcel B will be along Route 35, just inside the brick arches of Johnson Gates, which will be retained and preserved. After the first approved bidder backed out, the second-highest bidder began negotiating with FMERA about two years ago. The developer must demolish 1 million square feet of existing structures there. Final negotiations were underway in August for the 77- acre parcel, Nuse said, adding, “We hope to bring a contract to the FMERA board this fall. We’re excited about the project. It’s the front door of the fort.” In Oceanport, the town center will take the form of a “transit-oriented development” focused on the Little Silver Train Station in what was the fort’s “400 Area.” Extending along Oceanport Avenue and Oceanport Creek, that parcel is slated for housing and commercial uses to create a live- work-play environment. A Request for Offers to Purchase, or RFOTP, is expected to be issued for the area by the end of this year, Nuse said. Projects in development at the former Fort Monmouth.Photo courtesy FMERA “The big picture remains the same: 1,585 housing units,40 percent open space and technology is still the main goal,along with targeted industry and a town center for each of thethree municipalities the fort spans, Eatontown, Oceanport andTinton Falls,” said David Nuse, FMERA director of real estatedevelopment. By Laura D.C. Kolnoski “The Master Development Plan started in 2008,” Steadmansaid. “There have been 14 changes so far, but the plan stillguides us. There have been 12 years of marketplace changessince we began, but uses we are looking for are still consistentwith the plan.” The Two River Times met with officials of the Fort Monmouth Economic Revitalization Authority (FMERA) last month for an update and exclusive tour. While the public can now drive along the fort’s main artery Route 537, known through the fort as the Avenue of Memories, activity is happening in areas still inaccessible to all but the law enforcement and security personnel who patrol them. center_img TRIO OFTOWN CENTERS Residential tenants will drive retail development, said Sarah Giberson, FMERA senior marketing and development officer. “We hope to have local, new to the market, and/ or high-end niche businesses, not big box stores. There will be a Main Street ‘spine’ within the development and public space for things like farmer’s markets and events. A dog park and walking trails are among the proposals. We want it to be a place where people want to go.” Bruce Steadman, FMERA executive director, called it, “new wave retail that will be experiential, more than just shopping, so people can bring their family and spend time. That’s what makes a successful retail development today.” A concept plan will be presented at the approval stage, Giberson said. The Fort Athletic Club in the base’s former Fitness Center along the Avenue of Memories should be in business next year, Steadman said. The water tower on that site will be retained, painted and bear the club logo. Other sites breaking ground or opening for business in 2020 will be the former dance hall, bowling center and Squier Hall, currently being renovated by New Jersey City University. The massive new campus of RWJ Barnabas Health should also break ground in 2020 on the site of the former Myer Center, where demolition was recently completed. FORT MONMOUTH – Several completed deals are expected by the end of 2019 on Fort Monmouth, the 1,126-acre former U.S. Army base shuttered in 2005. More fort parcels are coming to market, construction will begin on approved redevelopment projects and other firms will soon open their doors to the public. Officials are predicting a period of accelerated activity through 2020. WHAT’S NEXT On opposite sides of the Avenue of Memories, Mallet Hall, a former Class A office building, and Vail Hall, a “communications hub in the switchboard days,” should go out for bid in early 2020, Steadman said. The Mallet Hall parcel is slated for housing. Steadman said there has been “a lot of interest” in Vail Hall. The projects above have already been completed at the former Fort Monmouth.Photo courtesy FMERA Among the Oceanport properties anticipated to go under contract in 2020 are Barker’s Circle, the Commissary and Nurses Quarters. In some cases, contracts could be signed in 2019 with the rest of the process stretching into 2020. That process includes board approval and due diligence by the prospective purchaser, followed by FMERA site plan review to work out any “kinks.” Afterward, plans go before municipal planning boards and governing bodies. The due diligence period can take up to 60 days, but can be extended depending on circumstances. “In addition to a number of (real estate) closings on schedule for this year, we are looking to put out three large RFOTPs by the end of the year, including 31 acres in Tinton Falls known as the Tinton Falls Commercial Development Parcel, the 400 Area, and the technology campus envisioned for the 50-acre McAfee Center, with space for start-ups to mature tech companies,” Nuse said. “That site could also include amenities and support companies to create a holistic campus, like a mini-Google campus and incubator.” Total reinvestment at Fort Monmouth is projected to be $1.5 billion to $2 billion once all is built out, Steadman said, adding, “It’s millions and millions of tax revenue for the three municipalities and the county; $2 million to $3 million per year for the county, and as much as 10 times that for the municipalities over a 10-year period. That’s how our ultimate success will be judged.”last_img read more