Margaret Mary Health named a 2019 Top 100 Critical Access Hospital

first_imgBatesville, In. — For seven out of the past eight years, Margaret Mary Health has been named one of the Top 100 Critical Access Hospitals in the United States by The Chartis Center for Rural Health. The ranking was based on iVantage Health Analytics’ Hospital Strength INDEX®, the industry’s most comprehensive assessment of rural provider performance. MMH was one of only three hospitals in Indiana to receive this designation.The INDEX recognizes hospitals that are excelling in managing risk, achieving higher quality, securing better outcomes, increasing patient satisfaction and operating at a lower cost than their peers. The list of the Top 100 Critical Access Hospitals and more information about the study can be found at iVantageINDEX.com/top-performing-hospitals.“We are honored to again be recognized as one of the top performing rural hospitals in the country,” said MMH President Tim Putnam. “This acknowledges the hard work and commitment to quality care provided by our providers, nurses, technicians and support staff.”last_img read more

Diversity and Inclusion Summit held on campus

first_imgOver the next few days, the USC School of Dramatic Arts will host a series of events to start a dialogue about the divisive issues such as race, gender, culture, ethnicity and personal identity. This year’s Diversity and Inclusion Summit began on Thursday with a series of workshops, panel discussions and performances focused on generating conversations among students. The summit, which runs through Oct. 30, was organized by SDA Associate Professor Anita Dashiell-Sparks, and follows a similar event held last year. According to Jacqueline Lawton, an assistant professor in the Department of Dramatic Arts at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and one of the summit’s speakers, last year’s summit focused on trying to diversify SDA in both its admission program and academic offerings. The event, Lawton said, came as a response to students pointing out to Dean David Bridel the lack of diversity in both the student population and the courses the school taught. Lawton led a workshop on gender identity and how that plays on stage, as well as a workshop specifically geared toward using theater for social change. “My work is very specifically geared towards student identifying micro-aggressions,” Lawton said. “It can be from the lenses of gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, whatever it is that causes pain or angst within them, so they can address it directly and speak about who they are.”This year, the program is split into two different sections. One part, which took place on Thursday and will take place again Saturday and Sunday, offers a series of panels open to the entire USC community. These panels offer perspectives on issues that are at the cornerstone of today’s social activism, including gender politics, cultural appropriation and the importance of making sure that artistic endeavors mirror the diversity of the population. One panel on Thursday afternoon focused on how gender is performed on stage, using the example of the play SEVEN. The panel featured one of the play’s seven playwrights to discuss the creative process involved with staging a play based on current events. Friday’s section is reserved for SDA students and faculty, and features a variety of breakout sessions and workshops with distinguished faculty from the department as well as guest speakers from all over the country. The finale of this event is the town hall at the end of the day, in which students can address questions and concerns directly with faculty and the directors of the program. The program features several more speakers, including writers and producers from shows like Empire and Private Practice, during its panels on Sunday on performing race and class struggles on screen. Sunday’s events also include a panel on how identity politics affects and is represented in mass media, led by the SDA faculty.last_img read more