No rollercoaster ride for Kyrgios, more even keel at Open

first_imgOSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ’a duplicitous move’ – Lacson Meralco ‘never the same’ after Almazan injury in PBA Finals FILE – Nick Kyrgios of Australia hits a return during the men’s singles against Steve Johnson of America at the Shanghai Masters tennis tournament in Shanghai on October 10, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / CHANDAN KHANNAMercurial Nick Kyrgios wants to keep an even keel as the pressure of home expectations weighs on him at this year’s Australian Open in Melbourne.The tempestuous 22-year-old has the brilliance and talent to win his national Open, yet it is his brittle state of mind that oftens malfunctions to his detriment.ADVERTISEMENT ‘I feel relaxed’“But at the end of the day I just need to know it’s a long year. I can’t expend too much energy on other things.“I want to kind of ride the highs, not as high as I usually do. If I lose a match, at the end of the day it’s a tennis match.“I kind of want to keep it even-keeled throughout the whole year rather than being such a rollercoaster ride. I guess right now that’s what I’m doing.”Kyrgios said he feels better placed to make a deep run at this year’s Australian Open.“I probably feel a bit better this time around. I feel relaxed,” he said.“Obviously, winning a tournament before you play a Grand Slam always helps.”Kyrgios said he had no injury problems heading into the tournament.“Yeah, my knee feel good. My physio flew in, so I’ve had him for the last two, three days. I’ve had the luxury of getting treated in my room at my hotel,” he said.“Haven’t been spending too much time around the courts. I’ve been kind of doing my practice, getting out of here, and just relaxing. So it’s been good.” OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ’a duplicitous move’ – Lacson He is facing Brazilian Rogerio Dutra Silva on his favourite Hisense Arena court in Monday’s first round and could face world number three Grigor Dimitrov in the fourth round, but he is taking it all in his stride.“I’d like to do well. I’m not going to say quarter-finals, semi-finals, anything like that. I just want to take it one round at a time,” Kyrgios said ahead of his fifth Australian Open campaign.“Everyone started the year hungry. They can play great quality tennis. I don’t want to look ahead at all. I want to take care of business one round at a time.”Kyrgios’s mental strength and attitude always come up in the conversation about his title chances, but he says he wants to keep things at an even keel.“I think last year there were periods where I was really good and really bad,” he said.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ Redemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie Thompson Scottie Thompson also worthy of Finals MVP, thinks Cone Brian Heruela arrival bolsters Phoenix backcourt, defense Kyrgios said he has the physical resilience to put together the best-of-five-set matches potentially over the two weeks.“I feel very confident in best-of-five matches. I’ve played a lot of them now,” he said.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Nextcenter_img Steam emission over Taal’s main crater ‘steady’ for past 24 hours Halep, Wozniacki eye maiden Slam in Serena’s absence Jiro Manio arrested for stabbing man in Marikina LATEST STORIES Roger Federer rates Kyrgios a threat to the established order in the year’s opening Grand Slam, but says the volatile Australian is a work in progress. “When he’s on, he’s on and he’s really difficult to beat… for him it’s day to day and then week by week, can you keep it up?” Federer said this week.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSTim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crownSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folk“For him it’s maybe in his mind and his body because he still needs to work much more than he currently is.”Kyrgios won his first home ATP Tour title at the Brisbane International and is looking to go further than a quarter-final appearance in Melbourne three years ago. Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award View commentslast_img read more

Eureka beats Arcata for first time since ’14

first_imgZach Reed had 21 points and the Eureka Loggers boys’ basketball team shocked the crowd and the Big 5 Conference with a 54-42 overtime win against the Arcata Tigers, Wednesday night, at Arcata High.Eureka started strong, building a seven-point lead early in the first quarter. Towards the end of the first quarter the Tigers woke up as Arcata bounced back to take a 19-12 lead at the end of the first.“We’ve stuck together through adversity,” Eureka head coach Robbie Thompson said. “Tonight was a …last_img read more

Humans Got Birdbrains by Convergent Evolution

first_imgScientists are learning that birds have brains remarkably similar to those of mammals.  This is contrary to a century of belief, PhysOrg said.  How did such similarities evolve for groups of animals so widely separated?  To explain it, evolutionists pulled out one of their common explanations: convergent evolution.    “For more than a century,” the article began, “neuroscientists believed that the brains of humans and other mammals differed from the brains of other animals, such as birds (and so were presumably better).”  Now, scientists at UC San Diego School of Medicine are finding that “a comparable region in the brains of chickens concerned with analyzing auditory inputs is constructed similarly to that of mammals.”  Specifically, “They discovered that the avian cortical region was also composed of laminated layers of cells linked by narrow, radial columns of different types of cells with extensive interconnections that form microcircuits that are virtually identical to those found in the mammalian cortex.”  This “revolutionary” discovery upends “this claim of mammalian uniqueness,” said Harvey Karten, one of the authors of the paper in PNAS.1    While it may be humiliating to find such similarities with chickens, it is even more of a problem for Darwinists.  “But this kind of thinking presented a serious problem for neurobiologists trying to figure out the evolutionary origins of the mammalian cortex,” the article continued.  “Namely, where did all of that complex circuitry come from and when did it first evolve?”  The researcher could only offer “the beginnings of an answer: From an ancestor common to both mammals and birds that dates back at least 300 million years.”  The laminar and columnar properties of cells in the neocortex “evolved from cells and circuits in much more ancient vertebrates.”  Neither the article and the paper used the term “convergent evolution,” but the implication is inescapable: since, according to the paper, birds are on “a parallel branch to mammals on the evolutionary tree,” their resulting similarities must have come about by convergence.1.  Wang, Brzozowska-Prechtl and Karten, “Laminar and columnar auditory cortex in avian brain,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, published online before print June 28, 2010, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1006645107.This “explanation” conveys no information; it merely pushes the required Darwinian miracle farther down the Tree icon.  Now Darwinians have to envision some primitive vertebrate ancestor, a lizard perhaps, getting lucky to receive a mutation pregnant with possibilities.  Some day, that mistake would lead to the song of the nightingale and The Song of the Nightingale (Stravinsky).  This double convergence involved both the cells of brains and their ability to produce musical output.  As long as we’re talking miracles, might as well splurge.(Visited 8 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Huge savings from green light bulbs

first_imgCFLs have saved South Africa 1800 MW of electricity. (Image: Red, green and blue) Eskom has revived previously mothballed stations to achieve power supply. (Image: Bongani Nkosi) MEDIA CONTACTS • Hilary Joffe Spokesperson Eskom +27 11 800 6993 or +27 79 697 9374 RELATED ARTICLES • Eskom build programme powers ahead • Solar power lights the way • Camden power station working again • Kusile power station to go aheadBongani NkosiThe largest rollout of energy-saving fluorescent light bulbs in the world has saved Eskom, South Africa’s power utility, 1 800MW of electricity over the last six years – a massive boost to the country’s power-saving drive.Between 2004 and 2010 more than 43.5-million compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) were distributed throughout South Africa, with Eskom installing them in households free of charge as part of the National Efficient Lighting Programme.“The electricity saved as a result of the marked reduction in consumption by lighting in homes and buildings across the country brings us closer to achieving our energy-saving targets,” Andrew Etzinger, a senior manager at Eskom, said in a statement on 17 January.In the programme, Eskom replaced power-hungry incandescent light bulbs with CFLs, which consume 80% less electricity and are more environment-friendly.“Eskom leveraged the programme to raise awareness of the importance to save electricity through converting to energy efficient lighting alternatives,” the utility said.CFLs have become an international trend, with government bodies promoting their use and even distributing them to households in programmes similar to those of Eskom. The utility said South Africa has rolled out the highest number of CFLs to date; Mexico is set to follow when its programme of rolling out 30-million CFLs is complete.The US federal government has urged citizens to opt for the energy-saving bulbs, pointing out that if every home replaced traditional lights with CFLs the country would save enough energy to light more than 2.5-million homes for a year, the US National Public Radio website reported in 2007. The government also said that using energy-saving bulbs in every home would save greenhouse gas emissions equivalent to that of 800 000 cars.Demand up, prices downAccording to Eskom there is now a growing demand for CFLs, which since 2004 has driven the price down significantly. Eskom said the current price of R15 (US$2.20) per bulb was more acceptable compared to the initial cost of between R60 and R80 ($8.75 and $11.65).The light’s design has also become more suitable for local use. “Over the past six years, we seem to have overcome all of the barriers that once discouraged the widespread use of CFLs,” Etzinger said.“Now that they are more affordable, easily accessible and can be used in almost any setting that we’d use a normal light bulb, the adoption of CFLs is really starting to gather momentum in this country, as it is elsewhere in the world.”Power crisis remainsBut South Africa is not yet off the hook when it comes to power supply. The 1 800MW saved with the CFL programme does not mean South Africans can slack off on energy saving. Eskom’s call to consumers to use electricity sparingly remains loud.Power supply will stay tight until the first unit of Medupi Power Station comes online in 2012, Eskom said. The coal-fired station is one of South Africa’s biggest power-generating infrastructure initiatives. Currently under construction in Limpopo province, Medupi’s six units will generate 4 788 MW when complete by 2015. Its first unit is scheduled to be commissioned in 2012.Kusile power station in Mpumalanga, another major project currently underway, will start generating power in 2014 when its first unit is commissioned. The two stations are part of Eskom’s build programme, through which the state-owned enterprise has also revived formerly mothballed stations.last_img read more

India lose men’s hockey final 0-8 to Aus

first_imgAfter holding equal possession with Australia in the beginning of the first half, India went down 8-0 at the end of the second half in the final match of CWG men’s hockey at the Dhyan Chand stadium. All Australian goals came through penalty corners.Indian men’s hockey team not only disappointed but were dealt a severe thrashing by Australia on the final day of the Commonwealth Games on Thursday, October 14.last_img