Ocean City Honors Veterans at Annual Ceremony

first_imgVeterans from all branches of the service were among the couple hundred in attendance at Ocean City’s annual Veterans Day Ceremony at Veterans Memorial Park on Tuesday.“They say life begins at the end of your comfort zone,” Maureen Hickman Caporaso told a couple hundred people gathered at Veterans Memorial Park on Tuesday for Ocean City’s annual Veterans Day ceremony.Colin Schweim and first-grade teacher Carrie MerrittCaporaso then said that her life began early.Her father, U.S. Air Force Capt. Vincent J. Hickman, was the navigator on a B-26 bomber that was shot down during a mission over South Vietnam on Jan. 14, 1964. It took troops five days to get to the site of the wreckage, and no bodies were found.Officially listed missing in action, Hickman became the 100th American casualty in Vietnam. He was 30, and he left a widow with four daughters under the age of five.In her keynote address, Caporaso said her father’s death made her mother and sisters independent and strong, and her mother ultimately walked her daughters down the aisle. But war in Vietnam was unpopular, and her mother received little help after her father’s death.“Every resource should be made available to veterans and their families,” Caporaso said in capturing the theme of the entire ceremony.The event included Ocean City Primary School first-graders Colin Schweim, Brandon Granger, Ava Hopely, Cody Schweim and Bryn Gallagher from Carrie Merritt’s class reading their thank-you letters to the veterans.Mayor Jay Gillian urged all in attendance to “take the time to thank a veteran,” and he made special note of the deaths this year of two veterans who were an integral part of the community: Joe DiOrio and Dick Grimes.“God just raised the bar taking these two gentlemen up there,” Gillian said.Ocean City Intermediate School sixth-grader Julia Wilson sang the “Star Spangled Banner” and “God Bless America.” Father Edmond Speitel gave the invocation, and the Rev. Gregory Johnson the benediction.American Legion Commander Bob Marzulli led the Pledge of Allegiance, and VFW Commander Mike Morrissey introduced the speakers. Veterans Clark Manley and Joseph Walters conducted the ceremonial placing of the wreath.__________Click here to sign up for OCNJ Daily’s free newsletter and breaking news alertslast_img read more

Finsbury invests in bakery divisions as sales drops

first_imgCake and bread manufacturer Finsbury Food Group has revealed group sales revenues dropped to £175.7m from £176.6m the previous year, following the sale of its free-from business in February last year.Second half growth in the UK bakery business reversed the first half decline and sales for the year were broadly flat at £153.7m in the report to the year ending 28 June 2014. Sales in Lightbody Europe, the group’s 50%-owned European business have declined by 1.2% for the full year to £22m. However, the business is in good shape with a shift to higher margins.Profit levels are ahead of last year as a result of introducing actions to increase sales via market activity as well as reduce costs via the benefits from capital investment and overhead reduction programme implemented in the second half. These actions also helped against ongoing cost inflation.In line with its stated strategy, Finsbury has doubled capital investment to more than £6m in the year.Within the UK bakery division, cake capital investment projects successfully completed in the year included the new single serve cake slice ‘snap pack’ line as well as the largest cake bites robotic picking installation in the world. The Nicolas and Harris speciality bread facility expansion, delivering 60% additional space, has also been successfully commissioned and is now fully operational.John Duffy, chief executive, said: “Our continued capital investment programme is heralding positive signs and we are encouraged by the contribution that this has made. Although cost inflation keeps margins under pressure, the strategies we have in place have mitigated against this and with more favourable profit dynamics; we are well placed to take advantage of the market as it improves.”last_img read more

Childhood Sexual Abuse, Gender Dysphoria, and Transition Regret: Billy’s Story

first_imgPublic Discourse 26 March 2018Family First Comment: An important commentary…“Many sexual abuse victims—like Billy, me, and others who write to me—get swept up by LGBT therapists who suggest that the proper treatment is to start on powerful sex hormones followed by gender “affirming” surgery. The problem is that hormones and surgery will not be effective in providing long-term treatment for depression or other ailments caused by sexual trauma. Too many therapists rush to prescribe radical hormonal and surgical measures before diagnosing and treating the psychiatric disorders shown to coexist in the majority of gender dysphoric clients: depression, phobias, and adjustment disorders. Billy’s story illustrates the importance of digging into why a person wants to surgically alter his or her body and not assuming that cross-dressing or role-playing as the opposite sex means that children need a sex change….”…. In the summer after sixth grade, Billy’s world came crashing down. At summer swimming league, Billy’s new diving instructor targeted Billy for sexual abuse—abusers have a knack for picking on the weakest kids. Billy says, “The coach played with me.” In other words, the diving coach perpetrated a horrific crime against a vulnerable child.Like the hundreds of female gymnasts who reluctantly came forward recently about the sexual abuse suffered years before at the hands of their sports doctor Larry Nassar, Billy was so traumatized that he did not tell anyone for a very long time. Billy pushed the emotions away with strenuous physical activity—bicycling, swimming, and running. Billy says he would do this “until the pain in my body was greater than the pain in my mind.” He also escaped by using his sister’s makeup and earrings. He says that after the sexual abuse “I so very much hated my appendage”—that is, his male genitalia.Billy is not the first who turned to a transgender identity to escape pain and trauma. In fact, Billy’s story is not all that different than my own. And in the stories I receive from other regretful people who attempted transition, childhood sexual abuse abounds.The shame and pain of being used by a sexual predator is beyond the imagination. Most abused kids push the feelings deep inside and shut out the memories. The pain, shame, guilt, and fear often keep them from telling anyone about the abuse until much later in life, if they ever do. Many sexual abuse victims—like Billy, me, and others who write to me—get swept up by LGBT therapists who suggest that the proper treatment is to start on powerful sex hormones followed by gender “affirming” surgery. The problem is that hormones and surgery will not be effective in providing long-term treatment for depression or other ailments caused by sexual trauma. Too many therapists rush to prescribe radical hormonal and surgical measures before diagnosing and treating the psychiatric disorders shown to coexist in the majority of gender dysphoric clients: depression, phobias, and adjustment disorders. Billy’s story illustrates the importance of digging into why a person wants to surgically alter his or her body and not assuming that cross-dressing or role-playing as the opposite sex means that children need a sex change….… I work with people who contact me because they regret attempting to change their sex. With impressive self-awareness, they clearly articulate what triggered their identification as transgender. They can always point to some situation—often but not always sexual abuse—in their past that caused them to want to escape who they were and become someone else instead.Most people who identify as transgender are suffering from any of a wide variety of undiagnosed comorbid disorders. Unfortunately, gender therapists too often affirm a trans identity by providing access to hormones and surgery while ignoring the underlying causes, which should be treated with sound, effective psychotherapy.It’s time for psychotherapists to seriously address the unique causes of each individual’s gender dysphoria before encouraging them to pursue hormones and surgery.Walt Heyer is an author and public speaker with a passion to help others who regret gender change. Through his website, SexChangeRegret.com, and his blog, WaltHeyer.com, Heyer raises public awareness about the incidence of regret and the tragic consequences suffered as a result.READ MORE: http://www.thepublicdiscourse.com/2018/03/21178/?utm_source=The+Witherspoon+Institute&utm_campaign=7add29a1be-RSS_EMAIL_CAMPAIGN&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_15ce6af37b-7add29a1be-84094405last_img read more

Students start petition to add Africana studies major

first_imgA USC sophomore has started a petition calling upon the University to establish an Africana studies major and employ a black professor in the history department.Austin Rogers, a sophomore majoring in history, is asking students to support an increase in black professors and Ph.D. students, as well as the implementation of more courses teaching the history of African-Americans, Africans and post-colonial independence. Right now the history department only has two black professors, Francille Wilson and Diana Williams, who are both leaving the University in May. In addition, there have only been two black Ph.D. history students to attend USC since the University’s founding 137 years ago.Rogers included those points on the petition after speaking with USC Diversity Director George Sanchez. “That was a really telling data point,” Rogers said. Rogers said he began to think about the issue about a year ago, after noticing that there are no classes in the history department dealing with the continent of Africa. He was also inspired after reading texts by Malcolm X on Afro-American history. “There’s this narrative that black culture begins with captivity,” Rogers said. “The goal of the petition is to challenge those assumptions and get more representation on campus.”Ogechi Ibeanusi, a senior majoring in English and history, helped Rogers organize the petition. Ibeanusi shared the petition as a Google form in multiple Facebook groups, including USC Black Class and Black Campus Minustries, last Wednesday. Rogers and Ibeanusi also posted the petition on their personal Facebook pages. “It got a really big response from people,” Rogers said. “I’m really grateful that there are people — allies — who aren’t even black who recognize the importance of learning about your shared history and ancestry and what that means for self-empowerment. I think that people just see that, and it’s almost common sense to be disappointed that the University doesn’t offer that.”Razzan Nakhlawi, a junior majoring in journalism, was one of the supporters who signed the petition and also shared it on Facebook. “I do think that … especially in terms of history and history departments at universities, having a decolonized and non-Eurocentric aspect of your education is really important,” Nakhlawi said. “I was really glad to see Austin making concrete change toward that.”Rogers noted that the University’s historical lack of involvement in these issues can be discouraging to students who want to learn more. “There is a precedent for the exclusion of these kind of studies,” Rogers said. “I mean like the petition said, it’s been 137 years, and there hasn’t really been a lot of traction. We’re facing a big, big obstacle.”However, Rogers remains hopeful that there is a chance that actions such as his can change this exclusion.“I’m optimistic that we can keep advocating and rallying people together and organizing,” Rogers said. “We’re not just helping black students but improving the University’s overall environment.”last_img read more