Danny’s 1950s TV love life

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREGame Center: Chargers at Kansas City Chiefs, Sunday, 10 a.m.– Y.R.L., Youngstown, Ohio A: You are right: Each astronaut named his own spacecraft. They all added “7” to acknowledge their fellow astronauts, known as the Mercury Seven. The astronauts were Scott Carpenter, Gordon Cooper, John Glenn, Gus Grissom, Wally Schirra, Alan Shepard and Deke Slayton. Slayton was grounded in 1962 with an irregular heartbeat; his reinstatement occurred 10 years later, and he flew on the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project in 1975. Q: Near Kinderhook, N.Y., is Lindenwald, the home of Martin Van Buren, the eighth president of the United States. Where did he get the name Lindenwald? – N.D., Waco, Texas A: Although Van Buren bought the home while still president, he didn’t move in until 1841 after losing his bid for a second term. He named the estate Lindenwald, Dutch for “linden wood,” after the trees lining the roadway in front of his estate. Question: I think my folks’ favorite TV program was “Make Room for Daddy,” starring Danny Thomas. As I recall, it aired on Tuesday nights, and that evening’s activities often revolved around the show. In the early years, Thomas had a wife. He was later a widower, and then, toward the end of the show, he remarried. What happened to his first wife? – Y.E.T., Providence, R.I. Answer: The show premiered in the fall of 1953 and continued until 1964. Thomas played a nightclub entertainer named Danny Williams. His wife, Margaret (played by Jean Hagen), quit the show in 1956, and her character was killed off. The following season, Danny began dating; the 1956-1957 season ended with him proposing to a young nurse named Kathy O’Hara (Marjorie Lord). The fifth season opened with the happy couple returning from their honeymoon. Q: I have a question about the Project Mercury spaceflight program. It is my understanding that each astronaut named his spacecraft, such as Freedom 7 (Alan Shepard) or Liberty Bell 7 (Virgil Grissom). Six manned Mercury flights all contained the number seven. What does that represent? Q: I know what a boll weevil is; yet I don’t. I know it devastates cotton crops, but where did it get that name? – G.P., Brattleboro, Vt. A: A weevil is a beetle, or a particular type of beetle, that is destructive to plants. The word comes from the Old English wifel, or beetle. Boll is a part of several different plants; in this case, the cotton plant. Q: Who wrote “What mighty contests rise from trivial things”? – E.C., Troy, N.Y. A: That is one of the lines from “The Rape of the Lock” by Alexander Pope (1688-1744). Q: Where is (or was) the Gosport Shipyard? – S.L.P., Dover, Del. A: The Gosport Shipyard was founded in November 1767 on the western shore of the Elizabeth River in the Virginia Colony. During the Civil War, when Union forces recaptured the naval yard, the name was changed to the Norfolk Naval Shipyard, even though it is located in Portsmouth, Va. The name Norfolk was probably chosen to avoid confusion with the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard that already existed in Kittery, Maine, near Portsmouth, N.H. Send your questions to Mr. Know-It-All at [email protected] or c/o United Feature Syndicate, 200 Madison Ave., New York, NY 10016 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

TICKETS GO ON SALE FOR DONEGAL’S ULSTER TITLE CLASH WITH MONAGHAN

first_imgTICKETS have gone on sale today for the Ulster Final in Clones on Sunday week (July 20).Donegal are hoping to de-throne Monaghan in a repeat of last year’s decider.Tickets are available through GAA clubs, online at tickets.ie or gaa.ie or at Centra shops throughout the county. It’s a unique Donegal double-header – the Minors take on Armagh in the curtain-raiser.The Minor game throws in at 2pm with the seniors at 4pm.Adult tickets for the Eastern Stand and Pat McGrane stand are €30, with €18 for OAPs and students and €5 for children.The Hill is €18 for adults, €13 for students/OAPs and €5 for children. Gerry Arthurs Stand ticket prices were not available but there are no discounts for children, students and OAPs there. TICKETS GO ON SALE FOR DONEGAL’S ULSTER TITLE CLASH WITH MONAGHAN was last modified: July 7th, 2014 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:ClonesdonegalJuly 20Monaghanticket detailsticketsUlster Finallast_img read more

Lyell’s Slow-and-Gradual Geology Is No Longer Tenable

first_imgby Dr Jerry Bergman The latest study published in the journal titled American Scientist is an article titled “Reexamining Lyell’s Laws” by New York Professor Michael Rampino. The article opines that “Increasing evidence points to the role of periodic catastrophes in the shaping [of] Earth’s history, challenging long-standing dogma within geology.”[i] The long-standing dogma is uniformitarianism, the idea that changes in the earth during geological history have resulted primarily from the action of slow, continuous and uniform processes. Furthermore, present geological changes have been considered the key to past geological changes. This perception contrasts with the theory that changes in the earth’s crust during geological history have resulted chiefly from rapid, violent and non-uniform events, such as floods.In short, the two views would explain the formation of the Grand Canyon by a little water over a very long period of time (uniformitarianism) or a lot of water in a short period of time (catastrophism). Darwin relied heavily on uniformitarianism in developing his theory of evolution because he realized for it to be viable requires an enormous amount of time to evolve life from simple organisms, such as bacteria, to complex organisms, such as humans.A book titled Principles of Geology by British lawyer-turned-geologist named Charles Lyell (1797-1875) postulated that the earth was shaped by very long period of slow, gradual changes. Principles of Geology was the most influential geological book in the middle of the 19th century. Lyle’s book was one of the few books that Darwin had with him on his 5-year-long voyage on the HMS Beagle. He studied the book carefully on his travels around the world and it turned out to be critical in his theory of evolution because it gave him the needed time for evolution to occur.The very foundation of Darwin’s theory was built on sand.Although uniformitarianism has dominated geology since the middle 1800s, in the past few decades it has been increasingly questioned by researchers. In his article, Rampino straight out stated that the scientific “evidence shows that Lyell was fundamentally wrong. Catastrophes indeed caused many major changes that we see in the geological record.”[ii] Thus, the very foundation of Darwin’s theory was built on sand. Rampino added that “Lyell mocked the idea that catastrophic changes had occurred in Earth’s history, and he railed against the zealous geological catastrophists” who studied the major effects of the geological forces that we regularly observe today, such as earthquakes, volcanoes, comets and meteorites.[iii]In spite of the overwhelming evidence against Lyell’s thesis, why was it accepted by so many geologists for so long? Rampino concludes the reason why it was widely accepted was because Lyell’s Principles of Geology was “a tight a priori argument” and its conclusions “seemed unassailable” in arguing a worldview that “proved to be extremely effective in the court of scientific opinion.”[iv]  Today it is recognized that uniformitarianism accounts for much geological history but that catastrophism accounts for a very significant portion of that history. Unfortunately, today “some geologists are still reluctant to appeal to catastrophic events, even when the geological evidence points that way.”[v] Such is the effect of dogma in science.[i] Michael Rampino. 2017. Reexamining Lyell’s Laws. American Scientist. 105(4):224-231. July-August.[ii] Rampino. 2017. p. 226[iii] Rampino. 2017. pp. 224-225.[iv] Rampino. 2017. p. 225.[v] Rampino. 2017. p. 231“…knowing this first of all, that scoffers will come in the last days with scoffing, following their own sinful desires. They will say, “Where is the promise of his coming? For ever since the fathers fell asleep, all things are continuing as they were from the beginning of creation.” For they deliberately overlook this fact, that the heavens existed long ago, and the earth was formed out of water and through water by the word of God, and that by means of these the world that then existed was deluged with water and perished.“ (II Peter 3:3-6)Dr Jerry Bergman, professor, author and speaker, is a frequent contributor to Creation-Evolution Headlines. For his previous entries, see his Author Profile.Dr Bergman’s latest book with Frank Sherwin, Fossil Forensics: Separating Fact from Fantasy in Paleontology, is due out later this year.(Visited 761 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more