Canada exempt from Trumps steel tariffs for undetermined period

He also pushed back against reports casting the process as arbitrary, sloppy and rife for successful legal challenges.In one alleged example of haphazard policy-making, a report this week said the president raised the tariff rates for branding purposes, increasing them from the 24 and 7 per cent recommended by the Department of Commerce — because he wanted nice, round numbers.The official insisted that was untrue. He said it was only upon careful calculation of import effects that the numbers landed at 25 per cent and 10 per cent. He did not explain how those round numbers managed to survive intact, even after the formula was later upended by the exclusion from tariffs of major suppliers.Canada is the No. 1 seller of both steel and aluminum to the U.S.The fact that Canada might be included on the initial hit list had become a political sore spot for the administration, as U.S. critics of the move ridiculed it by zeroing on the idea of national-security tariffs against a peaceful next-door neighbour and defence ally.A full-court diplomatic press unfolded in recent days, with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau calling Trump earlier this week, and then speaking Thursday with the Republican leaders of both the House of Representatives and the Senate.Canada’s ambassador to Washington dined this week with U.S. national-security adviser H.R. McMaster; Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland, Natural Resources Minister Jim Carr, Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan, and Transport Minister Marc Garneau all reached out to cabinet counterparts in recent days.The lobbying found a mostly receptive audience: the U.S. military strongly resisted tariffs against allies, and 107 congressional Republicans released a letter this week to express their alarm over the move.Expect a low-key response from Canada if Trump indeed intends to use temporary tariff relief as a bargaining threat. That means no talk of walking away from the table, nor any hint of making concessions under pressure.“Our position hasn’t and won’t change,” one Canadian source said Thursday. “We’re after a good deal, not any deal. We’ll take no deal rather than a bad one.”global steel and aluminum imports with tariffs of 25 and 10 per cent. They go into effect in 15 days. In a media briefing, he expressed frustration at the way the tariffs have been characterized, referring repeatedly to the “fake news,” the lobbyists and the “swamp things” that he said exaggerated the ill effects while fighting the measures.Two polls released this week say the tariffs are unpopular.But the same official said it truly is a matter of national security — with six U.S. aluminum smelters shutting down the last few years, and just five remaining, and only two operating at full capacity, he said that leaves the U.S. at risk of having to import all its aluminum eventually.“(This tariff-signing) should be a great day for America,” he said.U.S. President Donald Trump holds up a proclamation on aluminum during an event in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington, Thursday, March 8, 2018. He also signed one for steel. WASHINGTON — Canada can breathe easier, for now: It’s getting relief from U.S. tariffs for an undetermined period, as one of only two countries receiving a provisional exemption from the steel and aluminum penalties set to clobber the rest of the world.U.S. President Donald Trump signed proclamations Thursday slapping tariffs of 25 per cent on steel and 10 per cent on aluminum, and they snap into effect for the rest of the world in 15 days.After months of frantic lobbying, diplomatic arm-twisting, and heated debates within his own administration, Trump is signing the proclamations at the White House, surrounded by steelworkers.“For now, Canada and Mexico will be excluded from the tariffs,” said a senior White House official. “But it’s not open-ended.”Trump’s ‘ridiculous’ steel tariffs will only hurt U.S jobs and industry, Linamar CEO says‘Nobody wins’: Europe, IMF urge Trump to step back from trade warGary Cohn quits as Trump economic adviser, having lobbied hard against controversial tariffsHe sidestepped the question of whether the threat of tariffs will be used to bully Canada and Mexico at the NAFTA bargaining table. Speaking on condition of anonymity in order to discuss matters before they became public, he said only that the reprieve remains in place for now, and that NAFTA is important to economic and national security.That retains the semblance of a legal fig leaf for the administration.By law, the tariffs need to be described as a national security matter. A provision in a 1962 U.S. law allows the president to set emergency tariffs as a security issue. But the White House has repeatedly undermined its own legal case, including by intimating that the tariffs would be lorded over Canada and Mexico as some kind of negotiating tool to extract NAFTA concessions.The White House is now avoiding that kind of talk: ”We will have ongoing discussions with Canada and Mexico,” said the official. ”NAFTA discussions will be part of that only because NAFTA is an important part of the security relationship within the hemisphere.”For now, Canada and Mexico will be excluded from the tariffs. But it’s not open-endedsenior White House official Susan Walsh/AP Photo read more

Ketamine should be kept off worldwide illegal drugs list doctors say

first_img Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Ketamine is an essential anaesthetic and painkiller, especially in countries with limited options and poor storage facilities in their hospitals.Dr Jannicke Mellin-Olsen The powerful tranquiliser ketamine should be kept off a worldwide illegal drugs list despite it being abused by clubbers, doctors are arguing.They say it should always be treated as a medicine and not be placed under United Nations illicit drug restrictions The World Federation of Societies of Anaesthesiologists is calling for global support for its initiative to protect ketamine’s status as an essential medicine for anaesthesia and pain relief.China and other countries which have a problem with ketamine abuse want the drug included on the UN schedule for controlled drugs.Dr Jannicke Mellin-Olsen, newly-elected WFSA President, spoke out at the group’s World Congress in Hong Kong.She said: “Ketamine is an essential anaesthetic and painkiller, especially in countries with limited options and poor storage facilities in their hospitals.”Ketamine is used as the sole available safe anaesthetic in many parts of the world and is widely used in adults and children alike.Experts say it is also easily transported in situations such as disasters, in which vital lifesaving surgery can take place at the scene of the disaster, even outside the hospital. But China and some other Asian countries, including Thailand, have problems with ketamine abuse. They want access to be restricted in the same way that morphine is a scheduled or controlled substance.The UN’s Commission on Narcotic Drugs (CND) has so far not submitted to their demands. The World Health Organisation (WHO) has reviewed ketamine use several times since 2004 when the International Narcotics Control Board (INCB) first noted illicit use was a problem and encouraged countries to place the drug under controls.On each occasion, WHO has repeatedly warned that placing ketamine under international control would devastate access to safe surgery for billions.Dr Mellin-Olsen, who is based at Baerum Hospital in Norway, added: “Of course there are legitimate concerns about ketamine abuse, and these shouldn’t be discounted.”However, it also needs to be recognised that there is little to no evidence that abuse occurs in countries where it is the most essential anaesthetic.”The international drug control system has caused immense harm to access to medicines, and the system is still, today, out of balance.” WFSA has launched a “Ketamine is Medicine” campaign against the drug being subjected to international controls.Dr Mellin-Olsen added: “We call on the UN’s Expert Committee on Drug Dependence not to recommend any further restrictions on ketamine pending the collection of more reliable and complete data on the effects that this might have on the availability of this essential anaesthetic drug, and on patient outcomes around the world.”Associate Professor Philip Peyton, of Austin Hospital and the University of Melbourne in Australia, told the Congress: “Ketamine’s unique safety profile and effectiveness make it irreplaceable in anaesthetic practice.”However, concerns about ketamine’s recreational abuse have prompted international calls for its withdrawal.”This comes at an unfortunate time, as there is increasing interest in ketamine’s other potential therapeutic effects on chronic pain and postoperative delirium, which are now recognised as common and serious postoperative complications, as well as a possible emerging role in management of severe treatment-resistant depression.”Its unique value in the management of severe pain after surgery or trauma is now widely appreciated.” He added:”Much research still needs to be done to properly define the value of ketamine and its importance in clinical practice before any decisions about the future availability are made.”last_img read more