Kellogg plans to trim 7 per cent of workforce as part of

NEW YORK, N.Y. – Kellogg is planning to cut its global workforce by 7 per cent as the maker of Frosted Flakes, Rice Krispies and Special K struggles to convince Americans to eat more cereal.The company, which also makes Pop Tarts and Eggo waffles, also said Monday it expects earnings per share for the year to be toward the lower end of its previous projection as a result of weaker-than-expected sales. According to FactSet, Kellogg has 31,000 employees, suggesting the company plans to cut about 2,170 jobs.“Some employee notifications will take place this week,” the company said in a statement. The company would not confirm the total number of job cuts or specify how many would occur when.Kellogg says the workforce reductions will take place by the end of 2017, along with plant consolidations and other cost-cutting measures it’s dubbing “Project K.”Kellogg, based in Battle Creek, Mich., has been struggling to boost cereal sales in its flagship North American market. Although cereal remains a huge business, Americans have a growing number of options in the morning and are increasingly reaching for foods that they can eat on the go.In the latest quarter, Kellogg said sales in its U.S. Morning Foods segment fell by 2.2 per cent. The company has been trying to find new ways to get people to eat cereal, including a breakfast drink positioned as an alternative way to get the nutrients of a bowl of cereal. But it’s still too early to tell whether those efforts will catch on.To expand into the salty snacks business, Kellogg last year bought Pringles chips. The company is hoping that the chips will also give it a bigger presence overseas as well. But in the latest period, Kellogg said sales in the U.S. Snacks segment also fell by 2.5 per cent.For the quarter, Kellogg Co. said earned $326 million, or 90 cents per share. Not including one-time items, it earned 95 cents per share, which was above the 89 cents per share Wall Street expected.A year ago, the company earned $318 million, or 89 cents per share.Revenue slipped to $3.72 billion and was short of the $3.73 billion analysts expected.Kellogg’s shares rose 1.5 per cent to $63.25 in premarket trading. Over the past year, its stock is up more than 15 per cent.___Follow Candice Choi at www.twitter.com/candicechoi Kellogg plans to trim 7 per cent of workforce as part of cost-cutting program AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email by Candice Choi, The Associated Press Posted Nov 4, 2013 6:29 am MDT read more

Afghanistan UN mission welcomes final list of candidates for 2014 elections

“The completion of the candidate nomination period marks another important step for the Afghan people in the process of electing the country’s next leader and provincial councils,” said the Secretary-General’s Special Representative and head of UNAMA, Ján Kubiš.The list, announced by the country’s Independent Election Commission (IEC), contains 11 presidential candidates and 2,713 provincial council candidates, with the latter including 308 women.“The candidates and their supporters bear the responsibility of fully upholding Afghan electoral laws and other relevant electoral provisions, as well as international standards for peaceful, transparent, credible, inclusive and fair elections,” said Mr. Kubiš.The Special Representative also urged the Afghan electoral and state bodies, and the candidates and their teams, to take all measures to ensure the election process and their conduct are “marked by the highest degree of integrity, free from internal and external interference and fraud – all of which are so important for the acceptance and legitimacy of the outcome of the elections.”The UN has repeatedly stressed that the elections, scheduled for 5 April 2014, must be free and fair, and enjoy wide participation. The polls are seen as a vital step in the ongoing transition in Afghanistan, which next year will also see the withdrawal of the majority of allied international military forces, with national forces assuming full responsibility for security throughout the country. read more