3 reasons I’d buy this FTSE 100 stock even as it touches all-time highs

first_img “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. Enter Your Email Address Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! 3 reasons I’d buy this FTSE 100 stock even as it touches all-time highs Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. Image source: Getty Images. center_img Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. See all posts by Manika Premsingh Manika Premsingh | Wednesday, 9th December, 2020 | More on: AHT Manika Premsingh has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The Ashtead Group (LSE: AHT) was one of the biggest FTSE 100 gainers yesterday after it released its results. This added to its share price strength. At £33 in December, AHT’s share price is at £30-plus levels for the second month running now. Going by monthly averages, this month’s numbers also put the share price at an all-time high. There’s more. The stock is up almost 80% from the plunge it saw during the stock market crash earlier in the year. So why am I interested in buying the stock now? Simply because I think it’s in for even better times in 2021. There are three reasons for this.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…#1. Return to growth for the FTSe 100 stock2020 has been a bad year for much of the economy, and that goes for construction too. According to date from the Office of National Statistics, the official source of national income data, the segment is still 7.3% lower than it was in the pre-coronavirus period.But things are improving. In September, it grew by 2.9%. With overall economic growth expected to bounce back in 2021, the construction industry’s fortunes are set to improve too. With support to real estate pushing UK’s house prices to all-time highs, short-term support could be felt because of this too. #2. Diversified supportI’m also hopeful for Ashtead’s growth in 2021 because of its strong presence in the US. Its US subsidiary, Sunbelt, accounts for a substantial portion of AHT’s total revenues. According to Goldman Sachs’ latest update, the US economy will be back to pre-pandemic levels by the second quarter of 2021. The bank, which was bullish on the US economy in the event of a ‘blue sweep’ has pulled back its first quarter forecasts for 2021 after the recent rise in Covid-19 cases in the country. But, in the scheme of things, it’s still poised for growth. Importantly a £1trn fiscal stimulus package is expected, which can be particularly good for construction in so far as it’s directed towards infrastructure creation. #3. Further performance improvementI’m further encouraged to think that there’s good news ahead for AHT because of its own outlook. It now expects full-year results to be ahead of previous expectations. I can’t think of too many companies that are this confident in the current environment.Its results so far show resilience too. While its financials have been impacted by Covid-19, the hit from the pandemic wasn’t as bad as in the last result. Also, it remains comfortably profitable. It’s also a dividend paying stock. The dividend yield isn’t anything to write home about, but it definitely doesn’t hurt.I was bullish on Ashtead even before the results came out. In fact, it was my top stock pick for December in anticipation that it would turn a good set of results. Now that we have confirmation, I’d buy this FTSE 100 stock with even greater confidence.  Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shareslast_img read more

The Rolls-Royce share price is rising this week. Should I buy?

first_img Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” Image source: Getty Images The Rolls-Royce share price is rising this week. Should I buy? Alan Oscroft | Thursday, 18th February, 2021 | More on: RR I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. Alan Oscroft has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee.center_img Enter Your Email Address See all posts by Alan Oscroft I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares For years, I’ve liked Rolls-Royce (LSE: RR), but I’ve never got around to buying. Whenever the time came for me to make an investment, Rolls never quite made the top of my list. Maybe the Rolls-Royce share price looked a bit too high at the time. Or, more usually, there’s just something else I liked better.Warren Buffett famously spoke of investing in Gillette, and the warm feeling he got every morning when he thought of the millions around the world shaving with a new blade. I’ve always had similar feelings watching airline departures and arrivals. And thinking of all those lucrative maintenance contracts bringing in the cash for Rolls-Royce.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…But no comparison is perfect. Chins are still being shaved around the world during Covid lockdown. But the planes aren’t flying, and the Rolls-Royce share price has suffered. We’ve seen a modest climb this week though. Since market close last Friday, Rolls-Royce shares are up 8%, as I write. But I’d never make an investment decision based solely on short-term share price moves. And the bigger picture isn’t so pretty.Feeling bullishWe’re close to a year on from the start of the Covid-19 stock market crash. And, in that year, the Rolls-Royce share price has fallen 58%. But it had been slipping even before that. Over the past two years, Rolls-Royce shares are down 70%. So we’re looking at a pandemic catastrophe on top of an existing downward trend. So why am I starting to feel positive towards the stock?Well, my reason is essentially that I still see the long-term business as sound. When Rolls-Royce will get back to profit, I really can’t guess. And I still expect the rest of 2021 to be rocky for the Rolls-Royce share price.Then there’s the huge amount of debt the company’s had to take on, amounting to around £4bn now. That will have to be addressed some day. But, for now, the key question is whether Rolls will make it through the rest of this crunch year.The firm’s latest update at the end of January essentially said things are in line with expectations. Rolls expects free cash outflow of around £2bn in 2021, and I could see a few eyes watering at the prospects of that. But at the end of 2020, the company had around £9bn in liquidity — which it described as “at the upper end of the previously guided range.”Rolls-Royce share price cheap?Rolls-Royce is hoping for an upturn in the aviation business in the second half of the year. And that’s where I think the big risk lies. The Covid vaccination programme is progressing reasonably well. But there almost seems to be a new virus variant every week. And the government is still urging against booking fly-away holidays just yet.Still, with the Rolls-Royce share price around £1, or less, I really am tempted to buy. But I still don’t know whether I will. Again, it’ll depend on what other options might look more promising when the time for my next purchase comes along.last_img read more

Kicking in women’s rugby: Is there a better balance than in the men’s game?

first_img Rugby Explained: When to kick and when to… A look at the various kicking strategies employed in rugby Rugby Explained: When to kick and when to run LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Emily Scarratt: How to regain at restarts Kicking in women’s rugby: Is there a better balance than in the men’s game?Box-kicking boredom. Tedious kick-fest. Endless kick-tennis killing the game.All of these expressions were used to describe the rugby on show during the Autumn Nations Cup last year. Words like ‘turgid’, ‘ponderous’ and ‘aimless’ were also thrown around – perhaps more often than the ball in some Tests – with the prevalence of kicking unappealing to many viewers.Eddie Jones described critics of England’s style as “disrespectful” while saying rugby is going through a defensive cycle. There have been entertaining spectacles at club level that would disprove this assertion as well as improvements in the Six Nations.People might point to a match like the 11-try encounter between Bath and Wasps as an anomaly but in women’s rugby as a whole it would certainly be rare to see a long sequence of kicks back and forth, as there is generally a far better balance between kick-pass-run options.This hasn’t always been the case; in the early days of the women’s game and perhaps even as recently as a decade ago, players’ kicking out of hand lacked the distance and accuracy to be truly effective. In more recent years, however, there have been huge strides made. Top players now have more time to focus on technique and strength in training so they can kick better and further.“When I came into the England set-up in 2014, I thought we could make massive gains in the set-piece and the kicking game,” says Red Roses coach Simon Middleton. “We’ve now got a fantastic array of kickers and that’s not by chance. We’ve invested a lot of time in players and their ability to kick. We’ve got the strongest kicking game in the women’s game – that’s just a fact, not me blowing our own trumpet.“One of the trends I’ve noticed over the past two years is that the kicking strategy is rising. When we played the Super Series in San Diego (in 2019), the US and Canada started to kick a lot more. France have developed a strong kicking game.France full-back Shannon Izar clears against England (AFP/Getty Images)“It’s very dependent on the team you’re playing; the top three or four teams in the world kick the ball a lot more than other teams, and kick better. In the away game against Italy (in 2020), we kicked 21 times and Italy kicked 12 but away against France we kicked 32 times, they 27. Against Italy we kicked far less but still far more than Italy.”So how do kicking strategies compare between men’s and women’s rugby?We took the two Tests played between England and France at Twickenham last autumn, and compared the figures when it came to kicks out of hand in open play. The men’s Autumn Nations Cup final went into extra-time, so to create a more accurate comparison in the ‘map’ below we have focused only on kicks in the regular 80 minutes.The graphic makes it clear England’s men kicked far more than the women so let’s break it down a little further. The men kicked nearly twice as many times in the first half, with 17 compared to the Red Roses’ nine. Of those 17, six were by Ben Youngs whereas Red Roses scrum-half Leanne Riley kicked only once all game – more on the different box-kicking strategies later.Over the course of the 80, Jones’s side kicked 40 times compared to 23 for Middleton’s team – a vast difference. George Ford kicked 16 times and if you add the four he made in extra-time, he’s nearly putting boot to ball as often as the entire Red Roses squad.Where the two teams kicked from on the pitch was also interesting. A little over half of the Red Roses’ kicks originated from between the 22 and halfway lines in their own half whereas this rises to more than 70% in the men’s match. The men also kick more from the centre of pitch whereas more of the women’s kicks were on the edges.The differences in strategies is also evident in the percentage of possession kicked in the two games against Italy that secured their 2020 Six Nations titles. The men kicked three times more often.So why this stark contrast? Here’s Wasps Ladies director of rugby Giselle Mather: “In the men’s game now there’s a lot of kicking in the middle area of the field whereas in the women’s game we tend to run it more, we’re looking at handling and carrying. In the men’s game, the defence side of things is so strong that a lot of men’s teams prefer not to have the ball, to advance up the pitch without the ball and by kicking.”Test centurion Katy Daley-Mclean, who called time on her England career in December, believes there’s a better balance when it comes to kicking in the women’s game because there’s more room to keep ball in hand.She says: “There’s space on the pitch so you’ve got both options; there’s still the opportunity to move the ball to the edge and make space or go through the middle. The guys look like their only real option is to kick long and press. Then you see the Bath-Wasps game… The World Player of the Year gives her… There are other areas that could see a shift in focus when it comes to kicking. Daley-Mclean thinks the union version of league’s 40:20, the so-called 50:22 kick where a team that kicks indirectly into touch from their own half into their opponents’ 22 or their own 22 to their opponents’ half would throw into the lineout, would help to create space.“That could really change the game,” she says. “It would keep wingers closer to that touchline and would also make kickers more accountable. At the moment they’re kicking long, the other team kicks back, but it’s not done anything, you’re almost waiting for an error. For us, it’s always about finding grass or competition, some form of challenge.”That ‘challenge’ could be the next step forward when it comes to kicking in the women’s game. While that contest under a high ball is common in men’s rugby, it’s not so in women’s. England players like Emily Scarratt and Abby Dow are adept at chasing those high kicks and competing to catch them, but they are more an exception than the rule.Mather says: “On the whole players wait for them (opponent) to catch it and land, then smack them. Defensive takes players are okay at but the chasing take is a harder skill. We’re doing competitive aerial work now and in five years I think you’ll see it all over the place as players become more professional.”The hope is that women’s rugby does not resort to kicking at the level we’ve recently seen in the men’s game, though. Spectators like to see the ball kept in hand, sweeping attacking moves and powerful carries through the middle of the pitch.Yes, the weather can lead to a need to play more of a territorial kicking game, but some tactics we’ve seen in recent men’s Tests could be filed under ‘kick first, think later’ such has been their apparent aimlessness.Jones is right that rugby goes in cycles and perhaps the stricter breakdown laws, making the risks of taking the ball into contact higher, have seen teams retreat to more boot options. After all, it’s just 16 months since the World Cup final when England kicked the ball only 19 times. Look at the breakdown of kick-pass-run in the most recent men’s and women’s World Cup finals and the figures are quite similar.We haven’t seen as many kick-fests in the men’s Six Nations as last autumn while the hope is that the women’s championship can gain more traction in the public consciousness after moving to a standalone window in April.A combined audience of 1.91m tuned into the Red Roses’ two November fixtures against France on the BBC and Daley-Mclean says: “It’s letting more people access it and it’s an opportunity to change the perception of women’s team sport. For the people that say ‘I don’t care’, I’d challenge them to watch 15 minutes of those BBC games.”Given the negativity there has been around the men’s playing style, the Women’s Six Nations could be a welcome antidote. Collapse Expand Rugby Explained: When to kick and when to run Expand TAGS: Highlight All Blacks fly-half Beauden Barrett, the World Rugby… Beauden Barrett: How to mix your kicks Emily Scarratt: How to regain at restarts Beauden Barrett: How to mix your kicks “The kicking game is just not as good to watch. The one I hate is the long kicking battle in the 22s. We don’t have as many people on the pitch with the same length of boot in the women’s game, but we find that more space will open up after the second or third kick.”Wasps scrum-half Claudia MacDonald shows her box-kicking skills (Getty Images)Who kicks is another area where there is a disparity. England men kick a lot more from nine – Youngs actually kicked more often than Ford against Wales last November – whereas the women use the box kick minimally.Middleton says: “I’m not a massive fan of box-kicking. All our nines – Claudia MacDonald, Leanne Riley and Mo (Natasha) Hunt – can box-kick really well, but you only have to be a little bit out for the opposition to counter-attack. That’s why I’m wary of it.”That’s not to say box-kicking is rare in the women’s game. For example, Mather uses it a lot at Wasps: “If you kick from nine, chasers have to be on the back foot of nine; from ten, the forwards can’t move until they’re put onside.”Although she does serve a warning about caterpillar rucks and how having a lot of forwards concentrated in one part of the field means that teams can then be caught short of numbers if the opposition shift the ball quickly. As an aside, many would like the caterpillar to turn into a butterfly and fly away.MORE ON KICKING IN RUGBY This article originally appeared in the March 2021 edition of Rugby World magazine.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

Galatians 6:2 conference explores ‘bearing one another’s burdens’

first_img Rector Belleville, IL Featured Events Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Tags Africa, Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Martinsville, VA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Bath, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Twenty-three people representing six provinces – Burundi, West Africa, Central Africa, Southern Africa, Tanzania and the Episcopal Church – have come together for the Galatians 6:2 Conference with March 30 – April 3 in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Dar es Salaam, Tanzania] Building trust through deep, intentional listening to one another’s stories, helps to create a space where Anglicans and Episcopalians can begin to, as Paul wrote in Galatians 6:2, “Bear one another’s burdens ….”“You cannot become companions without creating the space where trust is developed,” said the Rev. Ranjit Mathews, the Episcopal Church’s Africa partnerships officer, who is helping to facilitate the Galatians 6:2 Conference underway here on Tanzania’s coast.As the theme, “Bear one another’s burdens and in this way you will fulfill the law of Christ” underscores, the March 30 – April 3 conference’s objective is to develop a model of collaboration that will enable the provinces to carry one another’s burdens in mission.Bishop Valentine Mokiwa of the Diocese of Dar es Salaam in the Anglican Church of Tanzania offered greetings to Galatians 6:2 Conference participants on March 30. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceTwenty-three people representing six Anglican Communion provinces – Burundi, West Africa, Central Africa, Southern Africa, Tanzania and the Episcopal Church – have come together for the conference which opened with participants setting goals and expectations, and a Bible study focused on Galatians 6:2. By midmorning March 31, following the Eucharist, and a group brainstorming session, participants broke up into five, small pre-established working groups organized around particular themes.The idea for the Galatians 6:2 Conference has grown in part out of a larger conversation driven by theological differences regarding human sexuality and same-sex marriage in the Anglican Communion, as well as an ongoing changing approach to mission relationships and partnerships between churches in the United States and Africa.In 2013, more than a decade after differences began to surface, Province of Burundi Archbishop Bernard Ntahoturi, who was then the general secretary of the Council of Anglican Provinces of Africa, suggested the Episcopal Church, through its silence, was allowing itself to be defined by others, particularly those who claimed its agenda was to promote homosexuality in Africa. He made his comments during a Global Anglican Future conference (GAFCON) in Nairobi, Kenya. In response to Ntahoturi’s comments, then-Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori sent the Rt. Rev. Oge Beauvoir, bishop suffragan of the Diocese of Haiti, as a special envoy to visit three other East African provinces to discern how churches could continue to work in partnership despite their differences. Ntahoturi suggested churches interested in working with the Episcopal Church find a practical way forward.Then in England in May 2014, the Fifth Consultation of Anglican Bishops in Dialogue, which brought together bishops from Africa and North America to work toward a deeper understanding of their common life in Christ in a diverse and global communion, suggested further conversation. The intentional dialogue in England was developed in response to those existing theological controversies, including issues related to human sexuality and same-sex blessings that have strained Anglican Communion relationships since the early 2000s.In October 2014, the primates of the six provinces represented here at the Galatians 6:2 Conference met at The General Theological Seminary in New York City where they set an intention to build missional partnerships among their churches.“The primates gathered together in that New York meeting made a point of looking beyond the differences that so often divide us and instead chose to recognize that we need one another and can accomplish much together as fellow Anglicans,” said the Rev. C. K. Robertson, canon to the Presiding Bishop for ministry beyond the Episcopal Church, during an interview with Episcopal News Service.More recently, during the January 2016 meeting of Anglican primates in Canterbury, the majority of primates in attendance called for temporary “consequences” to be placed on the Episcopal Church in response to the 2015 General Convention’s decision to change canonical language that defines marriage as being between a man and a woman (Resolution A036) and authorize two new marriage rites with language allowing them to be used by same-sex or opposite-sex couples (Resolution A054).The Rev. Jenny Coley, left, an Episcopal Church-appointed missionary working on disease control and prevention in the Province of West Africa, and the Rev. Jeanne Ndimubakunzi, who heads the Province of Burundi’s program on preventing gender-based violence participate in a small working group discussion on health and the environment. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceDespite the sanctions, the primates unanimously expressed their desire “to continue to walk together.” Anglican Communion Primates Meeting is one of the three instruments of communion. The Lambeth Conference of bishops and the Anglican Consultative Council, the Communion’s main policy-making body, are the other two. The Anglican Consultative Council is scheduled to meet April 8-19 in Zambia.“The Galatians 6:2 Conference is a reminder that we in the Episcopal Church remain vitally connected to our sisters and brothers in other parts of the Communion,” said Robertson, “and ties in with Presiding Bishop Michael Curry’s focus on the Jesus Movement themes of evangelism and reconciliation.”Earlier this week, Curry referenced the conference’s theme during a March 29 call for a season of prayer for regions of the Anglican Communion that are experiencing violence and civil strife, including nearby Burundi, where a political crisis has led to hundreds of deaths and the displacement of 240,000 people to neighboring countries.In New York, in 2014, the primates framed their conversation in the context of “human dignity and flourishing, the sustainability of common ministry and the care of the earth.” Moreover, they committed themselves to exploring pension schemes, resource and financial stewardship, health services, mining and related environmental issues, advocacy, migration and statelessness, human trafficking, religious freedom and theological education. This commitment conceived the themes for this conference’s working groups.The working groups are continuing conversations focused on nine topics that were established in advance of the conference. The nine topics are: sustainability, health/environment, human trafficking/migration, theological education/religious freedom, and finance/pension.Johnson Chinyong’ole, center, general secretary of the Anglican Church of Tanzania, and Joseph Osei, archdeacon of the Manhyia Archdeaconry in Kumari, Ghana, participate in the pension plans and finance working group. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceBearing one another’s burdens also is a way of reorienting the traditional approach to missional partnerships, leading to relationships based in mutual respect and trust.“It’s not just hearing, but active listening and being able to empathize with the other person,” said the Rev. Canon Isaac Kawuki-Mukasa, who works both as Anglican Church of Canada’s Africa relations coordinator and Africa relations for the Episcopal Church.This is rooted in the 1963 Anglican Congress held in Toronto, Canada, that sought to transform the understanding of mission and relationships around the Anglican Communion.“This requires constant practice,” said Mathews, adding that this listening is something that’s not common.It is something, however, conference participants are modeling in their working groups as they begin to share their stories with one another.In the afternoon, after the working groups finished the day’s discussions, common themes around access to and paying for theological education, building local awareness around the problem of human trafficking and the worldwide problem of forced displacement began to emerge.Conference goals include working toward a comprehensive action plan for collaborative mission based on the work of the working groups.– Lynette Wilson is an editor/reporter for Episcopal News Service. 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Red Pepper House / Urko Sanchez Architects

first_imgphotographs:  Alberto Heras, Stevie MannPhotographs:  Alberto Heras, Stevie Mann, Collaborators:Satt, Fernando NavadijosClient:Fernando Garcia TorresCity:LamuCountry:KenyaMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© Alberto HerasRecommended ProductsWoodAccoyaAccoya® Cladding, Siding & FacadesWoodLunawoodThermowood FacadesPorcelain StonewareCosentinoSurfaces – Dekton® Chromica CollectionPorcelain StonewareGrespaniaPorcelain Tiles- Coverlam BriefSave this picture!Ground Florr PlanThe client, Fernando Torres, wanted a private residence that shared a connection with Lamu but was secluded from the main town itself. He had a passion for architecture and at the same time liked to be in contact with nature. Combining these two attributes, a chance was presented to create a form of organic architecture that had a balance of traditional craft and modern requirements. The client had great respect for the environment and wished that the design process preserved the forest as much as possible. Likewise, the construction process and eventually the running of the building were to share the same attribute.There are very specific needs of the client.- The house was to be designed in zones that could be occupied by the whole family or reduced to one when he was alone.Save this picture!Courtesy of Urko Sanchez Architects- Fernando wanted to have one acre of the plot secluded for his friend, Rafa, where a private residence would eventually be designed for him too.- Fernando also had a knee problem, which meant that the house would have to be designed on one floor.- He is a major contributor to the Anidan Children’s Shelter that lies not far behind the plot and desired to have a close relationship with the orphanage. Eventually Fernando would like to profit from a design where parts of the house could be rented out yet still maintain a barrier of privacy between the occupiers and himself.Save this picture!Courtesy of Urko Sanchez ArchitectsThis needs made necessary to revisit the Swahili traditional catalogue of solutions to give response to very specific demands.LocationSave this picture!© Stevie MannLocated on the island of Lamu towards the north end of the town, the plot is immersed in vegetation and bordered by the beach on its southeast slopes. The forest, consisting mainly of mangroves, provides very few open spaces in between and hosts an abundance of chirping birds. These natural features enable the development of a building, whose design creates a harmonious dialogue with its surroundings. Without being completely isolated from the local population, its location provides a space where privacy is safeguarded by the nature that surrounds it.Challenge and ResponseThe challenge is to give response to very specific requests not specifically related to the local tradition and to do it using the local construction systems, workmanship, and sense of space, looking towards the future yet having one leg grounded in the past. Gaining knowledge from local Lamu construction, the project will be approached in a similar way and, paying great respect to the surrounding environment.Save this picture!© Stevie MannThe house is to be integrated with the history and nature of the island composing a dialogue of organic architecture.Space distributionSave this picture!Courtesy of Urko Sanchez ArchitectsThe idea is to respect all the big trees on site and take advantage of them to create a disposition of open/closed and sunny/shadowy areas. The footprint of the house is the result of building only in the areas not occupied by trees. this footprint corresponds to the area covered by the roof structure with no walls, the only enclosed spaces are the bedrooms which are linked together under the continuous roof.Architectural languageThe architecture incorporates different levels of closure that create a transition between indoors and outdoors.Save this picture!Courtesy of Urko Sanchez ArchitectsArriving to the house from Lamu we find small coral stone masonry houses on the sandy beach creating a scattered urban pattern. This layout and material is used for the setting out of the bedrooms, the only fully enclosed spaces in the house, presenting a sense of security and intimacy.In the Swahilli architecture the makuti  roof is used as a structure over the roof of the house or detached as a temporary construction. Here it has been enlarged to cover the dispersed layout of the rooms under a single space protecting from sun and rain, In this external spaces one can share a close connection with nature.Save this picture!Courtesy of Urko Sanchez ArchitectsThe relation between the traditional elements has been altered to meet the client’s requests.EnvironmentThe whole design and construction process was engineered to be as eco-friendly as possible. The footprint using the open spaces avoids cutting down the mangroves.Save this picture!© Stevie MannThe use of purely manual labour and local materials such as timber and coral stone ensured that the project had minimal impact on the environment with a very low carbon footprint. Local craftsmen intricately completed the traditional handiwork.Save this picture!Courtesy of Urko Sanchez ArchitectsIn order to exploit the sunny climate of Lamu, the project hosts two different solar energy collection devices. Solar water heaters absorb the sunlight and use the energy to heat water. The advantage of these solar heaters is that hot water is available on demand throughout the course of the day without negatively affecting the environment. It only seems right that the same idea is incorporated in generating power and thus the project also uses photovoltaic cells to provide electricity to the house. Like the construction process, the use of solar energy ensures that the running of the building also keeps a very low carbon footprint and minimal environmental impact.Save this picture!© Alberto HerasThe house accommodates a water tower that uses gravity to send water to the taps and showers and eradicates the need for a pressure pump.Temperature controlLamu can get very hot during both day and night.Passive means of ventilation are used. Save this picture!Courtesy of Urko Sanchez ArchitectsCross ventilation by having windows or large open spaces on the windward and lee sides of the building allows airflow across the space. This naturally cools the room. Winds passing over the sea will bring a cool breeze into the house and the lack of energy usage in this process makes the building very sustainable.Save this picture!Longitudinal section, ElevationThe materials used play a part in keeping the building cool. The traditional makuti roof provides a barrier from the sun and is also a good thermal insulator. The coral stones used for construction share the same quality keeping the rooms cool.Project gallerySee allShow lessTunnels Under London: the Largest Infrastructure Project in EuropeArchitecture NewsFill out the Women In Architecture SurveyArchitecture News Share Year:  Hotels Photographs Red Pepper House / Urko Sanchez Architects Save this picture!© Alberto Heras+ 36 Share CopyAbout this officeUrko Sanchez ArchitectsOfficeFollowProductsWoodBrick#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsHospitality ArchitectureHotelsResidential ArchitectureHousesLamuHousesHotels and RestaurantsKenyaPublished on December 02, 2013Cite: “Red Pepper House / Urko Sanchez Architects” 02 Dec 2013. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Read commentsBrowse the CatalogPartitionsSkyfoldChoosing the Skyfold Wall for Your SpaceGlass3MGlass Finish – FASARA™ GeometricShower ColumnshansgroheShoulder ShowersPanels / Prefabricated AssembliesMorin Corp.Metal Wall Systems – ExposedStonesCosentinoSurfaces – Dekton® Stonika SeriesConcrete FloorsSikaIndustrial Floor CoatingsHanging LampsLouis PoulsenPendant Lights – KeglenDoorsSky-FrameInsulated Sliding Doors – Sky-Frame SlopeThermalSchöckMinimizing Thermal Bridges in BalconiesWindowspanoramah!®ah! Ultra MinimalistEnclosures / Double Skin FacadesAlucoilStructural Honeycomb Panels – LarcoreWork ChairsDynamobelWork Chair – SLAT 16More products »Read commentsSave想阅读文章的中文版本吗?肯尼亚红辣椒住宅 / Urko Sanchez Architects是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream Kenya ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/453440/red-pepper-house-urko-sanchez-architects Clipboard 2009 Architects: Urko Sanchez Architects Area Area of this architecture project Area:  1500 m² Area:  1500 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project CopyHotels, Houses•Lamu, Kenya Red Pepper House / Urko Sanchez ArchitectsSave this projectSaveRed Pepper House / Urko Sanchez Architects “COPY” Year:  ArchDaily Projects ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/453440/red-pepper-house-urko-sanchez-architects Clipboard “COPY” 2009last_img read more

Comparative analysis of a teleost skeleton transcriptome provides insight into its regulation

first_imgAn articulated endoskeleton that is calcified is a unifying innovation of the vertebrates, however the molecular basis of the structural divergence between terrestrial and aquatic vertebrates, such as teleost fish, has not been determined. In the present study long-read next generation sequencing (NGS, Roche 454 platform) was used to characterise acellular perichondral bone (vertebrae) and chondroid bone (gill arch) in the gilthead sea bream (Sparus auratus). A total of 15.97Mb and 14.53 Mb were produced, respectively from vertebrae and gill arch cDNA libraries and yielded 32,374 and 28,371 contigs (consensus sequences) respectively. 10,455 contigs from vertebrae and 10,625 contigs from gill arches were annotated with Gene Ontology terms. Comparative analysis of the global transcriptome revealed 4249 unique transcripts in vertebrae, 4201 unique transcripts in the gill arches and 3700 common transcripts. Several core gene networks were conserved between the gilthead sea bream and mammalian skeleton. Transcripts for putative endocrine factors were identified in acellular gilthead sea bream bone suggesting that in common with mammalian bone it can act as an endocrine tissue. The acellular bone of the vertebra, in contrast to current opinion based on histological analysis, was responsive to a short fast and significant (p<0.05) down-regulation of several transcripts identified by NGS, osteonectin, osteocalcin, cathepsin K and IGFI occurred. In gill arches fasting caused a significant (p<0.05) down-regulation of osteocalcin and up-regulation of MMP9.last_img read more

EUNAVFOR Force Commander Visits HNLMS De Zeven Provinciën and ESPS Navarra

first_img View post tag: africa The Dutch frigate is currently conducting the last patrol of her 4 months deployment in the EU’s counter-piracy Operation Atalanta, whilst the Spanish Frigate ESPS Navarra will remain in the area of operations until December.During the visits, the Force Commander met with the Comanding Officers of both, De Zeven Provinciën and Navarra, and their officers and ships company, followed by a brief and a tour of the ship, providing Rear Admiral Rando with an overview of the vessels’ main capabilities.On board HNLMS De Zeven Provincien RADM Rando attended a Medal Ceremony where he presented the Commanding Officer, Commander Ruud Schoonen, and the Commander of the Maltese Special Duties Enhanced Boarding Team (MSDEBT), Lieutenant Colonel Cardona with the Operation Atalanta medal.The Force Commander highlighted that “the Maltese Team embarked on HNLMS De Zeven Provincien is an excellent example of cooperation between nations and the European effort for operations at sea.”To enhance interoperability, it is not unusual for allied armed forces to exchange personnel. The Force Commander would welcome an increase in the exchange of personnel between units deployed with the EU Naval Force to improve mutual understanding of national procedures on board and thus increase effectiveness. To that end, ITS Andrea Doria and ESPS Navarra arranged for a temporary exchange of crew members from both sides.[mappress]Press Release, August 20, 2014; Image: EU Navfor Share this article View post tag: EUNAVFOR Authorities View post tag: HNLMS De Zeven Provinciën EUNAVFOR Force Commander Visits HNLMS De Zeven Provinciën and ESPS Navarra View post tag: ESPS Navarra View post tag: News by topic View post tag: europe View post tag: Force Commander On 15 and 16 August the Force Commander of EU Naval Force (EUNAVFOR), Rear Admiral Guido Rando, visited HNLMS De Zeven Provinciën and ESPS Navarra. View post tag: visits View post tag: Navy View post tag: Naval August 20, 2014 Back to overview,Home naval-today EUNAVFOR Force Commander Visits HNLMS De Zeven Provinciën and ESPS Navarra last_img read more

Rain fails to spoil first day of Unmanned Warrior

first_img Rain fails to spoil first day of Unmanned Warrior October 12, 2016 View post tag: Unmanned Warrior View post tag: Royal Navy Back to overview,Home naval-today Rain fails to spoil first day of Unmanned Warrior center_img A damp day across the Western Isles greeted the dozens of range staff, RN augmentees and Joint Warrior liaison teams who turned out before first light on the first official Unmanned Warrior flying day and headed for the brightly lit Range Control Building 12 miles south of Benbecula on the island of South Uist.But the upbeat Met forecaster opening the flying brief – at flying speed – assured the assembled Unmanned Warriors that matters would soon be improving and flying could commence on time.So it proved, with first launches being made within minutes by the Schiebel team’s Camcopter 100, with radar pod, and Boeing’s Scan Eagle (benefitting from a quick hair dryer blast over its wings before launch) hosting themselves into a slowly lifting gloom.These were swiftly followed by others sent to differing parts of the reserved airspace as per the complex matrix of the flight plan, carefully crafted to avoid the very real risk of autonomous collision in the skies.Out at sea the assembled Joint Warrior fleet awaited the benefits of this energetic flood of unmanned reconnaissance.And with some interest. Because a significant part of this business is understanding and learning the best way of commanding and controlling many systems, each looking out in different ways (radar, multi-camera, infra-red) and for different things.For these demonstrations the information the fleet commander receives is supported and filtered by a ‘booster’ team of technicians and planners, operations professionals and system experts.These are not wanted (nor likely to be available) on operational voyages. This must be done by a trained few. So a considerable emphasis has been laid on MAPLE, a rather undistinguished white ISO container which houses the C2 (Command and Control) for different autonomous systems and should show the way ahead.One is afloat on the support ship Northern River, one at the range on the Kyle of Lochalsh and the other in Benbecula.They may look unimpressive, but they are the eye of the storm in Unmanned Warrior.Operated jointly by BAe Systems and the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory they have to keep data outputs from all 40 different demonstrating systems (and not just the flying ones) coming and going – and readable by all.That’s a lot of square pins to file down to fit into round holes. Authorities Share this articlelast_img read more

St. Vincent Evansville Birth Announcements for June

first_img Jenna and Justin Deer, Poseyville, IN, daughter, Hallie Marie, June 14Katie Sisk, Evansville, daughter, Madalynn Anne-Marie, June 14Heaven Hilderbrandt and Hunter Hamilton, Evansville, son, Wyatt Wayne, June 15Shanna and Jonathan Kelly, Evansville, daughter, Cassandra Jean, June 15Christy Majors and Richard Lively, Evansville, daughter, Rosaline Quinn, June 16Kim and Josh Jackson, Evansville, son, Evan Thomas, June 17Veronica and Nicholas Trabant, Bicknell, IN, son, Logan Joseph, June 17PJ Mackey and Robert McKim, St Croix, IN, son, Rowen Eugene, June 17Taryn Young and Jordan Hunter, Princeton, IN, daughter, Aaliyah Denise, June 18Sara and Nathan Wood, Evansville, son, Camdyn Kye, June 19Emily and Jacob Voyles, Carmi, IL, son, Landon Ren, June 19Taylor Tutt and Kevin Zirkelbach, Evansville, son, Walker David, June 19Ashley and Travis Thompson, Grayville, IL, son, Miles Wayne, June 20Charlotte Weiss and Eugene Agent, Wadesville, IN, son, Sebastian Edgar, June 20FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

Guy Earns Another GLVC Honors As Eagles Jump Six Spots

first_imgFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare Guy Earns Another GLVC Honors As Eagles Jump Six SpotsUSTFCCCA Top 25 Computer RankingsEVANSVILLE, Ind.—University of Southern Indiana senior All-American Johnnie Guy (Palmyra, Indiana) was named the Great Lakes Valley Conference Men’s Indoor Track Athlete of the Week for the third consecutive week in a vote by the league’s coaches.Guy ran the nation’s fastest time in the 5,000 meters this past Friday at the Vanderbilt Invitational as he went wire-to-wire to finish first in the event with an NCAA Division II provisional mark of 14 minutes, 11.28 seconds. He already owns the fastest time in Division II in the 3,000 meters after posting a mark of 8:05.22 at the Gladstein Invitational.This is the sixth time in Guy’s career he has garnered GLVC Indoor Track Athlete of the Week honors. He has earned a combined nine GLVC Indoor and Outdoor Track Athlete of the Week awards and five GLVC Cross Country Runner of the Week honors.Guy was the U.S. Track & Field and Cross Country Coaches Association Division II Track Athlete of the Week following his performance at the Gladstein Invitational last week.USI’s men jumped six spots to No. 16 in the latest USTFCCCA Top 25 Computer Rankings. The Screaming Eagles return to action Friday and Saturday when they compete at the Don DeNoon Invitational in Carbondale, Illinois.last_img read more